Registar
Página 19 de 20 PrimeiroPrimeiro ... 917181920 ÚltimoÚltimo
Resultados 271 a 285 de 291

Tópico: DirectX 12

  1. #271
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
    Registo
    Nov 2013
    Local
    City 17
    Posts
    30,005
    Avaliação
    1 (100%)
    Ou então vão roubar algumas coisas à AMD (Tomb Raider, remember )
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  2. #272
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
    Registo
    Nov 2013
    Local
    City 17
    Posts
    30,005
    Avaliação
    1 (100%)
    VXAO Explained – Highest Quality AO, Available on All DX11 GPUs; Supports DX12 and OpenGL 4.5, Too


    VXAO (Voxel Ambient Occlusion) was announced ahead of Rise of the Tomb Raider’s launch and then added in a recent update, alongside support for DirectX 12. It’s part of the GameWorks 3.1 update, along Volumetric Lighting and HFTS (Hyper Frustrum Traced Shadows).
    This is the first real world application for VXAO, which NVIDIA considers the “next step in ambient occlusion technology” beyond HBAO+. Alexey Panteleev, Senior Developer Technology Engineer at NVIDIA, was the lead engineer on VXGI (Voxel Global Illumination) and he also presented VXAO (which is derived from VXGI) during his Advanced Ambient Occlusion Methods for Modern Games GDC 2016 presentation.
    Unfortunately the slides haven’t been published yet, but Panteleev divulged lots of information in a blog post on the official NVIDIA developer website.
    He began by reiterating how VXAO was designed.
    One of these features has been left with too little attention: the ambient occlusion mode, or VXAO as we call it. The idea is simple – we remove the lighting part [from VXGI] and keep only the occlusion part. Obviously, it is much less resource intensive: computing VXAO for a frame can be 2-10x faster than computing full global illumination solution, depending on settings. At the same time, VXAO is 3-4x slower than HBAO+, while its results are much better than HBAO+.
    If you have worked with screen-space ambient occlusion algorithms, you know the primary issues that they come with. These are:

    • Dark halos or lack of occlusion behind foreground objects;
    • Unstable results near screen borders;
    • Locality, which means that only a small volume around a surface contributes to AO;
    • Blurriness, which comes from a blur filter required because computing a complete solution for every pixel would be too expensive.

    VXAO has none of these issues because it is based on a different principle. Instead of relying on screen space data, it gathers information from a world space voxel representation of the scene, which covers a large area around the viewer. It doesn’t matter if some object is not visible to the viewer – it can be behind something else, or even behind the viewer – it’s still there, and it still contributes to ambient occlusion. VXAO uses voxel cone tracing, so objects that are relatively far from the surface under consideration can still contribute, and taking them into account is not as expensive as it would be in a screen space algorithm.
    Let’s take a look at this image comparison.
    READ NVIDIA Covers DX12 & New Rendering Tech For Modern Games At GDC 2016; HBAO+ Ultra, VXAO, Predication & More


    As highlighted by Panteleev, the obvious differences can be mainly found in the following places:
    Advertisements


    • Ground under the tank: no occlusion from HBAO+, some occlusion from VXAO.
    • Bottom part of the tank tracks: no occlusion from HBAO+, significant occlusion from VXAO.
    • Metal stand on the left side: a lot of occlusion from HBAO+, almost none from VXAO.
    • Barrel behind the fire hydrant: halo around the hydrant from HBAO+, no halo from VXAO.

    According to him, this new Ambient Occlusion technology handles dynamic scenes quite well.
    Most of the voxel data can be preserved between frames, unless there are lots of moving objects or the camera moves quickly. And even if no voxel data can be preserved, voxelizing geometry again is not too expensive. Voxelization of a typical, high-detail game scene with a few million triangles can be done in about 3-5 milliseconds on a modern GPU like GeForce GTX 980.
    Overall, there are three major passes in the VXAO algorithm: voxelization, voxel post-processing, and cone tracing. Voxelization is performed by rendering the triangle meshes into a 3D texture, and as such, its performance highly depends on the total number of triangles, size of these triangles, and the number of draw calls required to render them. Post-processing combines passes like clearing, filtering and downsampling voxels, and its performance depends on the total number of voxels produced during voxelization. Typical post-processing time is 0.5 – 1.5 ms. And finally, cone tracing is performed in screen space, so its performance depends on the screen resolution, shading rate, and the cone tracing pass in 1080p resolution.





    Developers can rest easy in terms of memory management too. The requirements are much lower than VXGI, which can go anywhere from 500MB to 7GB with the highest settings, while VXAO is generally between 6 to 100MB. Panteleev then proceeded to clarify that both VXGI and VXAO are far from exclusive to Maxwell or even NVIDIA GPUs.

    Finally, if you saw the original announcement of VXGI at Maxwell launch, you may think it works only on Maxwell. That’s not true. Maxwell does have some useful hardware features, but the only one relevant to VXAO is pass-through geometry shaders, which improve voxelization performance by approximately 30%, and they can be safely replaced with regular geometry shaders. So VXGI in general and VXAO in particular can work on all DX11 class GPUs, including ones made by NVIDIA competitors, but Maxwell GPUs deliver the best performance. It’s not limited to DX11 either: DX12 and OpenGL 4.5 are also supported.
    Going back to Rise of the Tomb Raider, the first implementation in an actual game of this technique, Panteleev explained that the particular art and lighting solution employed in this title doesn’t allow VXAO to shine in all situations equally.
    The game has separate channels for ambient lighting and ambient occlusion, and how exactly they are used is determined by materials. The ambient occlusion channel is often applied on top of direct lighting as well, and because VXAO is not a local effect and tends to add occlusion to large surfaces, some lights become dimmer. So we had to apply VXAO to the ambient light channel instead and keep HBAO+ in the ambient occlusion channel in order to achieve the best look. It became clear that VXAO is mostly a long-range effect, and it’s useful to combine it with some short-range SSAO technique to highlight small features which cannot be adequately represented by voxels. For this reason, VXAO now includes an optional screen-space occlusion pass so that you don’t have to work with a separate SSAO library.

    VXAO can be easily enabled by those developers using Unreal Engine 4. In that case, you just need to set the console variable “r.VXGI.AmbientOcclusionMode” to 1 and enable VXGI Diffuse Tracing in Post-Process Volume settings. If you’re using any other engine you’ll have to integrate VXAO into it, though Panteleev promises that the process is not too complicated.
    READ Rise of the Tomb Raider Gets DX12 & VXAO Patch; VXAO Called the World's Most Advanced AO Solution

    The distribution package, alongside the samples and an integration tutorial, can be found here.


    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  3. #273
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
    Registo
    Nov 2013
    Local
    City 17
    Posts
    30,005
    Avaliação
    1 (100%)
    Microsoft: DirectX 12 adoption rate is fastest ever

    It looks like developers are wasting absolutely no time in upgrading to DirectX 12 as Microsoft has revealed that its new graphics API has the fastest adoption rate of any DirectX version. DirectX 12 is the latest graphics API from Microsoft and it has strong ties to Windows 10, which has also been seeing strong adoption rates over the last year.
    Speaking at the Build conference today (via: VentureBeat), Phil Spencer spoke out on ways that Microsoft is trying to make it easier for developers to create games that can then be deployed across multiple devices, including Xbox One and PC.

    While early examples of real-world DirectX 12 performance from Rise of the Tomb Raider, Gears of War: Ultimate Edition or Hitman haven’t been the best, on paper, the new graphics framework should be 50 percent more efficient than DirectX 11. DX12’s other major advantage is a reduction in latency between the CPU and the GPU, providing an overall bump to frame rate.
    As more and more developers get on board with DirectX 12, the kinks that we are currently seeing in some games will be ironed out. The next game to launch sporting DirectX 12 will be Quantum Break, which is built on Microsoft’s new UWP format, which comes with a few limitations for PC gamers but Spencer has said that support for more PC-centric technologies is coming, like G-Sync/Freesync and V-Sync. The platform is also going to take a more open approach going forward, following on from Epic founder, Tim Sweeney’s concerns that were voiced a short while back.
    Noticia:
    http://www.kitguru.net/components/gr...-fastest-ever/


    Era de admirar se fosse o contrário, quando são conhecidas todas as vantagens do DX 12 (e Vulkan) face ao anterior DirectX 11, logo quando é melhor todos querem.
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  4. #274
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
    Registo
    Nov 2013
    Local
    City 17
    Posts
    30,005
    Avaliação
    1 (100%)
    DX11 vs DX12 AMD CPU Scaling and Gaming Framerate

    One thing that has been on our minds about the new DX12 API is its ability to distribute workloads better on the CPU side. Now that we finally have a couple of new DX12 games that have been released to test, we spend a bit of time getting to bottom of what DX12 might be able to do for you. And a couple sentences on Async Compute.

    DX12 and CPU Usage

    So for the last year, the Video Card Forums have been abuzz with "very adult" discussions about DX12 and the benefits attached to it. One thing that has been very much discussed is about how DX12 will better utilize our multicore CPUs. We have recently covered Rise of the Tomb Raider and its DX12 patch. We took notice to one statement that the developer had to say about their DX12 implementation.


    Even though the game can use all your CPU cores, the majority of the DirectX 11 related work is all happening on a single core. With DirectX 12 a lot of the work is spread over many cores, and the framerate of the game will run at can be much higher for the same settings.

    For Rise of the Tomb Raider the largest gain DirectX 12 will give us is the ability to spread our CPU rendering work over all CPU cores, without introducing additional overhead.
    This is surely a feature that all computer hardware enthusiasts want to see working! Jurjen Katsman, Studio Head at Nixxes Software pointed out, that they increased framerate from 46FPS to 60FPS in a particular scene by moving to DX12.


    As an example to illustrate the point, below is a screenshot of a scene in the game running on an Intel i7-2600 processor with 1333Mhz memory, paired with a GTX 970. Using DirectX 11 at High Settings we would only get 46 fps. Now look at the same location the new DirectX 12 implementation, we can lift it up to 60!



    Benchmarking the DX12 Data

    This all got me excited about collecting data points and sharing those here and I dove into Rise of the Tomb Raider built-in benchmark here on my CPU and Motherboard test bench. What my goal was to find CPU-limited workloads, and see how those performances scale as we relieve the CPU limitation. Of course we want to do this in system environments that are GPU limited somewhat and not GPU limited at all.


    To make a long story short, after running well over 300 RoTR benchmarks, I did not have the data that I needed to show the differences outlined by Nixxes' screenshots. And quite frankly a screenshot of a single point in a game is worthless for actually proving the point. Since we do not have a way of collecting real world gameplay framerate data in DX12 as of yet, our hands are tied to the in-game benchmark. While average framerates are solid in terms of data accuracy, we were not seeing any support for the DX12 advantage statements above. I looked at utilizing the minimum framerate numbers generated by the benchmark, but this benchmark is simply not a good tool for collecting minimum framerate data. When looking at minimum framerates produced by the RoTR benchmark, you will see variance in scores by up to 33%, run to run. With that consideration, I ran large sets of benchmarks with the intention of finding some good data after averaging the numbers. That was fruitless as well. The Rise of the Tomb Raider benchmark SUCKS when it comes to utilizing the minimum framerate data. There is simply not a wide enough swath of data taken by the benchmark; it is simply too narrow in scope. I have seen some folks throwing these numbers around as "proof" of their points; just let me say that a good description of that would be "bullshit." In terms of canned benchmarks, Rise of the Tomb Raider's is one of the worst I have seen implemented in a long time...not that I look at those much to be honest. So I moved on.

    Ashes of the Singularity, currently the poster child for Async Computing (Yes, I will touch on Async later as well.), also has a built-in benchmark. Its benchmark actually is very well constructed for testing CPU workload scaling in DX11 vs. DX12. We did a preview of the game's performance using its canned benchmark tool last week; Ashes of the Singularity Day 1 Benchmark Preview. After running about 150 sets of benchmarks with the AotS benchmark tool, I felt as though we had some solid data to share with our reader. (Yeah, we actually run the benchmark more than once and just start posting data!)

    In terms of visual fidelity, AotS is not that impressive. In fact with all of its graphical features turned on at 1440p with DX12, an AMD Radeon R9 Fury X card and the right CPU you can make the benchmark 0% GPU limited. This is however a Real Time Strategy game that can get to a massive scale in terms of units on the screen, so in terms of a CPU workload being generated, it is quite able to do that depending on the system. So while AotS is a good DX12 benchmark in terms of CPU workload, it is not much of a GPU testbed, which is perfect for what we are doing here today.

    Linked below is a full resolution AotS screenshot saved from the beginning of the benchmark as a PNG file. The linked image is a 6MB. Not to bag on the game, but there is just not much eye candy to look at.





    continued...

    GPU Limited Performance Using GTX TITAN

    For this set of data we are going to be looking at CPU scaling with DX11 and DX12 using the older TITAN card in the Ashes of the Singularity benchmark. As described previously, its performance lands between the GTX 680 and 780 video cards. Inside the AotS game, there are visual presets. We have used "High" and "Crazy." This should allow you to match our settings if you want to compare at home. We have made no other changes.



    We do see an increase at both clock speeds moving from DX11 to DX12. At 2GHz we see a 12.3% average framerate increase, and at 4.3GHz we see a smaller 8.6% increase. Theoretically speaking we should see our best improvements here, as our GPU quality settings are the least GPU bound. According to the benchmark, which will show us this data in DX12, we are 0.4% GPU bound in this benchmark at its "normal batch" workload at 2GHz. And 39.4% GPU bound at 4.3GHz. As the bottleneck in the system starts to be our GPU instead of our CPU, we see the percentage increase between DX11 and DX12 drop.



    Moving our visual quality settings up a couple notches to Crazy, gives us tighter results. And our DX12 benchmarks show to be 51.5% GPU bound at 2GHz and 92.2% GPU bound at 4.3GHz in this test. At 2GHz we see a 12.3% improvement, and at 4.3GHz we record a 3% decrease. This all jives exactly with what we saw in our Ashes of the Singularity Day 1 Benchmark Preview last week. With our NVIDIA card, as our framerate moves towards being GPU bound, we see the NVIDIA card give us better framerates under DX11.




    We see the same trend continue as we move up to 1440p resolution with our Crazy visual setting. At 2GHz, DX12 still loads out the CPU better, this time with a smaller 8.8% increase, and GPU bound at 76.5%. At 4.3GHz we are showing to be almost 100% GPU bound. All test runs at 4.3GHz showed over 99.5%. Again, once we are mostly GPU bound, DX11 gives us better performance.

    Please keep in mind that all of this information is NVIDIA specific, but it does support all the conclusions we talked about last week in terms of AotS performance.


    Toda a review:
    http://www.hardocp.com/article/2016/...e#.Vw9YIXr0Pug
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  5. #275
    Master Business & GPU Man Avatar de Enzo
    Registo
    Jan 2015
    Local
    País Campeão Euro 2016
    Posts
    6,589
    Avaliação
    41 (100%)
    Interessante review.
    Devido à falta de espaço na assinatura, resolvi colocar em "Acerca de mim" os meus projectos]
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/member.php?u=801

  6. #276
    Tech Mestre Avatar de Winjer
    Registo
    Feb 2013
    Local
    Santo Tirso
    Posts
    9,129
    Avaliação
    3 (100%)
    Microsoft introduces tool that analyzes the performance of DX12 games, may improve DX12 optimization

    Por enquanto os resultados em jogos a DX12 deixou um bocado a desejar. Se esta ferramenta ajudar a mudar a situação, vai ser bom para todos.

  7. #277
    O Administrador Avatar de LPC
    Registo
    Mar 2013
    Local
    Multiverso
    Posts
    15,232
    Avaliação
    31 (100%)
    Citação Post Original de Winjer Ver Post
    Microsoft introduces tool that analyzes the performance of DX12 games, may improve DX12 optimization


    Por enquanto os resultados em jogos a DX12 deixou um bocado a desejar. Se esta ferramenta ajudar a mudar a situação, vai ser bom para todos.
    Boas!
    O DX12 está a ser o DX10... Grandes promessas e para já nada a se ver...
    Até a versão DX11 do Quantum Break corre melhor que a versão DX12 e com os mesmos gráficos...

    Já o no Vulkan, vimos enormes ganhos, e num super motor! Isso é que para mim deve ser o caminho...
    Acesso ao Vulkan é ter acesso tb aos utilizadores de Linux e W7...

    Cumprimentos,

    LPC

    My Specs:
    Case: Phanteks Eclipse P400S - CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 - 2700X @ XFR2 Ghz - Board: Gigabyte AORUS X470 Ultra Gaming - RAM: 16GB DDR4 G.Skill RipJaws V 3200Mhz CAS 14-14-14-34 (2x8GB) - GPU: PALIT Nvidia GTX 1080 Super JetStream 8 GB
    Cooling: Arctic Cooling 3x F14 Silent - CPU Cooler: Arctic Cooling: Liquid Freezer 360 (6xF12 Fans) - Storage: Samsung SSD 840 EVO 1 TB - PSU: EVGA G3 750W - Monitor: ACER XB270HU 1440p @ 144hz G-Sync

  8. #278
    Tech Mestre Avatar de Winjer
    Registo
    Feb 2013
    Local
    Santo Tirso
    Posts
    9,129
    Avaliação
    3 (100%)
    Nem tanto. O DX10 foi um super falhanço, onde se perdia desempenho em todos os jogos, em todas as marcas de gráficas.

    O DX12 tem melhorias de desempenho em vários jogos e dá aumentos de desempenho nas gráficas da AMD e nas mais recentes da nVidia.
    Se não fosse o scheduler simplificado das kepler e maxwell, nem perdiam desempenho. O sheduler das Pascal parece ser menos mau e por isso já não perde desempenho, sendo que até ganha uns pozinhos.

  9. #279
    O Administrador Avatar de LPC
    Registo
    Mar 2013
    Local
    Multiverso
    Posts
    15,232
    Avaliação
    31 (100%)
    Citação Post Original de Winjer Ver Post
    Nem tanto. O DX10 foi um super falhanço, onde se perdia desempenho em todos os jogos, em todas as marcas de gráficas.

    O DX12 tem melhorias de desempenho em vários jogos e dá aumentos de desempenho nas gráficas da AMD e nas mais recentes da nVidia.
    Se não fosse o scheduler simplificado das kepler e maxwell, nem perdiam desempenho. O sheduler das Pascal parece ser menos mau e por isso já não perde desempenho, sendo que até ganha uns pozinhos.
    Boas!
    Tudo muito aquém do prometido...

    E isso era o comparativo que eu estava a fazer face ao DX10... O mesmo prometia novos efeitos, melhores performances, um "nova" geração de gaming...
    O DX12, dizia que ia ser a revolução... Close to metal, suporte para placas de forma indiscriminada, optimização para 8 cores, bla bla bla...

    O que se falou e o que se tem são duas histórias diferentes...

    Cumprimentos,

    LPC

    My Specs:
    Case: Phanteks Eclipse P400S - CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 - 2700X @ XFR2 Ghz - Board: Gigabyte AORUS X470 Ultra Gaming - RAM: 16GB DDR4 G.Skill RipJaws V 3200Mhz CAS 14-14-14-34 (2x8GB) - GPU: PALIT Nvidia GTX 1080 Super JetStream 8 GB
    Cooling: Arctic Cooling 3x F14 Silent - CPU Cooler: Arctic Cooling: Liquid Freezer 360 (6xF12 Fans) - Storage: Samsung SSD 840 EVO 1 TB - PSU: EVGA G3 750W - Monitor: ACER XB270HU 1440p @ 144hz G-Sync

  10. #280
    Tech Mestre Avatar de Winjer
    Registo
    Feb 2013
    Local
    Santo Tirso
    Posts
    9,129
    Avaliação
    3 (100%)
    No cumprimento de promessas, aí falham os 2 bastante. Sem dúvida.

  11. #281
    Tech Bencher Avatar de reiszink
    Registo
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    5,128
    Avaliação
    5 (100%)
    Intel i7 5820K - ASRock X99M Killer - 16GB G.Skill DDR4 - Gigabyte GTX 980Ti G1 - Plextor M6e 256GB + Samsung 850 EVO 500GB - Corsair H110 - EVGA G3 750W - Acer 27" 144Hz IPS - Zowie EC2-A - Filco Majestouch 2 TKL - HyperX Cloud II Pro

  12. #282
    O Administrador Avatar de LPC
    Registo
    Mar 2013
    Local
    Multiverso
    Posts
    15,232
    Avaliação
    31 (100%)
    Citação Post Original de reiszink Ver Post
    Boas a Nvidia a dar alguma coisa...

    O Hsun deve estar doente... ou algo...

    Muito bom para quem tiver essas gráficas!

    Cumprimentos,

    LPC

    My Specs:
    Case: Phanteks Eclipse P400S - CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 - 2700X @ XFR2 Ghz - Board: Gigabyte AORUS X470 Ultra Gaming - RAM: 16GB DDR4 G.Skill RipJaws V 3200Mhz CAS 14-14-14-34 (2x8GB) - GPU: PALIT Nvidia GTX 1080 Super JetStream 8 GB
    Cooling: Arctic Cooling 3x F14 Silent - CPU Cooler: Arctic Cooling: Liquid Freezer 360 (6xF12 Fans) - Storage: Samsung SSD 840 EVO 1 TB - PSU: EVGA G3 750W - Monitor: ACER XB270HU 1440p @ 144hz G-Sync

  13. #283
    Tech Mestre Avatar de Winjer
    Registo
    Feb 2013
    Local
    Santo Tirso
    Posts
    9,129
    Avaliação
    3 (100%)
    Diga-se que o Fermi tinha um scheduler muito mais avançado que o do kepler. Por isso até é de estranhar que só agora a nVidia tenha "dado" suporte para DX12.
    Não me admirava muito de ver as Fermi a ter melhorias superiores em DX12 e Vulkan, comparado com o DX11, do que as kepler e Pascal.

  14. #284
    Tech Mestre Avatar de Winjer
    Registo
    Feb 2013
    Local
    Santo Tirso
    Posts
    9,129
    Avaliação
    3 (100%)
    A Microsoft anunciou a adição de funções raytracing para o DX12.

    Expanding DirectX 12: Microsoft Announces DirectX Raytracing


    Uus dos primeiros tech demos.



  15. #285
    O Administrador Avatar de LPC
    Registo
    Mar 2013
    Local
    Multiverso
    Posts
    15,232
    Avaliação
    31 (100%)
    Boas!
    Será o futuro, mas não me parece que seja já...

    Ainda é preciso fazer muita coisa no campo do raytracing...

    Cumprimentos,

    LPC

    My Specs:
    Case: Phanteks Eclipse P400S - CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 - 2700X @ XFR2 Ghz - Board: Gigabyte AORUS X470 Ultra Gaming - RAM: 16GB DDR4 G.Skill RipJaws V 3200Mhz CAS 14-14-14-34 (2x8GB) - GPU: PALIT Nvidia GTX 1080 Super JetStream 8 GB
    Cooling: Arctic Cooling 3x F14 Silent - CPU Cooler: Arctic Cooling: Liquid Freezer 360 (6xF12 Fans) - Storage: Samsung SSD 840 EVO 1 TB - PSU: EVGA G3 750W - Monitor: ACER XB270HU 1440p @ 144hz G-Sync

 

 
Página 19 de 20 PrimeiroPrimeiro ... 917181920 ÚltimoÚltimo

Informação da Thread

Users Browsing this Thread

Estão neste momento 1 users a ver esta thread. (0 membros e 1 visitantes)

Bookmarks

Regras

  • Você Não Poderá criar novos Tópicos
  • Você Não Poderá colocar Respostas
  • Você Não Poderá colocar Anexos
  • Você Não Pode Editar os seus Posts
  •