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Tópico: DirectX 12

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    Tech Mestre Avatar de Winjer
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    DirectX 12

    Já começamos a ver o que vem com o DirectX 12 e parece promissor.
    O teste que mostram aqui foi feito claramente para mostrar o que já está feito no DX12. Um aumento de 50% num teste pesado em primitives e drawcalls parece bastante promissor e em linha com o que já vimos no Mantle.

    DirectX 12 cuts power consumption in half and boosts FPS by 50%

    Microsoft has been touting the improvements which DirectX 12 will bring to the table. Listening to the claims of its creator is one thing, but seeing real-world tests on actual hardware is another. At SIGGRAPH 2014, Intel has demonstrated the performance and power benefits of DirectX 12 on a Surface Pro 3 (which uses the company's HD4400 graphics chip.)
    The demonstration renders an asteroid field with 50,000 unique asteroids in it which equates to 50,000 draws per frame. Each asteroid is unique through procedurally-generating a combination of vertices, textures, and constants. To show the improvements, the demo is able to switch between DirectX 11 and 12 at the press of a button whilst locking the frame rate to keep the GPU workload constant.
    When rendering exactly the same content, DirectX 12's power consumption was impressively over 50% less than its predecessor. A key improvement in DirectX 12 is its ability to intuitively share the workload across multiple cores, and the performance gains we are seeing here show this in action.
    Reduced power consumption doesn't, of course, directly relate to increased performance. It does however lead to a much cooler device which as a side-effect allows the GPU to run hotter and faster. In a blog post on MSDN, Microsoft claims: "In some cases, DirectX 12 can take a game that’s otherwise unplayable on DirectX 11 without even increasing the power your device consumes!"
    Intel demonstrated this through unlocking the frame rate in their demo to show a 50% increase in FPS (frames per second) using DirectX 12 - despite not drawing any extra power. Whilst not directly comparable, it could show promise to boosting the Xbox One's prowess.

    Currently many game developers are choosing between a 1080p resolution at 30fps, or 900p at 60fps for their Xbox titles. The situation has been relieved somewhat through the June XDK which unlocked an extra 10% CPU power that was previously reserved for the Kinect peripheral. If a similar 50% power consumption reduction is possible on the console as found on the Surface Pro 3, then it too could see around a 50% increase in frame rate when DirectX 12 titles start hitting in 2015.
    All of the gains displayed come directly from switching to DirectX 11 to DirectX 12. The API, through working with hardware partners, has lower-level access than ever before which significantly improves CPU utilisation. Even AMD, who has their own low-level API named 'Mantle', has put their support behind DirectX 12. Nvidia has announced all of its DirectX 11 GPUs will support the latest version.

    DirectX 12 saves on power consumption and boosts FPS

  2. #2
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    A ver vamos como a Xbox beneficia disto.

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    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
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    Isso para já tem muitas semelhanças com o que já se viu do Mantle.
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

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    Tech Mestre Avatar de Winjer
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    Citação Post Original de Turtolius Ver Post
    A ver vamos como a Xbox beneficia disto.
    Garantidamente menos do que no PC. A Xbox, apesar de usar uma versão do DX11, não tem uma API gráfica com um nível abstracção tão elevada como o DX11 no PC.
    Mesmo assim deverá servir para utilizar melhor os recursos do CPU para iniciar o pipeline de renderização.
    Como é óbvio, as vantagens para o GPU serão mínimas pois não é aqui que reside o bottleneck de uma API com abstracção.

    Aliás, até defendo que o maior incentivo da MS em criar o DX12 como uma API low level é mais para atacar o mercado de dispositivos moveis, do que para beneficiar o mercado de jogos de PC.
    Nos dispositivos moveis temos fortes limitações de espaço, calor e consumos e por isso os recursos gastos numa API com um nível elevado de abstracção acabam por pesar bastante no desempenho.

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    Uma ajudinha na melhoria das resoluções de 900p para 1080p e 30fps seguros era o perfeito.

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    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
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    Vamos a ver se a grafica da consola tem pedalada para isso, mas se tal acontecer é bastante bom.
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

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    Tech Mestre Avatar de Winjer
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    Citação Post Original de Turtolius Ver Post
    Uma ajudinha na melhoria das resoluções de 900p para 1080p e 30fps seguros era o perfeito.
    O problema da resolução não é por causa da API, é por causa de ter metade dos ROPs da PS4 e apenas um terço da largura de banda de memória.
    O que o DX12 pode fazer é permitir que o CPU cause menos bottlenecks. Isto é bastente importante, pois como o CPU destas consolas é tão fraco, que ter uma API que use bem os seus recursos é importante para evitar quebras nos FPS.

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    O Administrador Avatar de LPC
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    Citação Post Original de Horus-Anhur Ver Post
    O problema da resolução não é por causa da API, é por causa de ter metade dos ROPs da PS4 e apenas um terço da largura de banda de memória.
    O que o DX12 pode fazer é permitir que o CPU cause menos bottlenecks. Isto é bastente importante, pois como o CPU destas consolas é tão fraco, que ter uma API que use bem os seus recursos é importante para evitar quebras nos FPS.
    Boas!
    Concordo...

    Os gajos poderão ser mais na onda de manter mais estaveis os frames.
    Tanto X1 como a PS4, precisam de todas as artimanhas e truques possíveis para poderem esticar o hardware...

    E mesmo assim vai ser uma luta para conseguirem o que seria desejável nesta geração de consolas.... 1080p sempre a 60fps com pelo menos 2xAA

    Cumprimentos,

    LPC

    My Specs:
    Case: Phanteks Eclipse P400S - CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 - 1600 @ 3.9 Ghz - Board: MSI B350 Tomahawk - RAM: 16GB DDR4 G.Skill RipJaws V 3200Mhz Cas 14-14-14-34 (2x8GB) - GPU: ZOTAC Nvidia GTX 1060 AMP! 6GB
    Cooling: Arctic Cooling 3x F14 Silent - CPU Cooler: Arctic Cooling: Liquid Freezer 360 (6xF12 Fans) - Storage: Samsung SSD 840 EVO 1 TB - PSU: EVGA G3 750W - Monitor: ACER XB270HU 1440p @ 144hz G-Sync

  9. #9
    Tech Mestre Avatar de Winjer
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    Microsoft Details Direct3D 11.3 & 12 New Rendering Features

    Back at GDC 2014 in March, Microsoft and its hardware partners first announced the next full iteration of the Direct3D API. Now on to version 12, this latest version of Direct3D would be focused on low level graphics programming, unlocking the greater performance and greater efficiency that game consoles have traditionally enjoyed by giving seasons programmers more direct access to the underlying hardware. In particular, low level access would improve performance both by reducing the overhead high level APIs incur, and by allowing developers to better utilize multi-threading by making it far easier to have multiple threads submitting work.

    At the time Microsoft offered brief hints that there would be more to Direct3D 12 than just the low level API, but the low level API was certainly the focus for the day. Now as part of NVIDIA’s launch of the second generation Maxwell based GeForce GTX 980, Microsoft has opened up to the press and public a bit more on what their plans are for Direct3D. Direct3D 12 will indeed introduce new features, but there will be more in development than just Direct3D 12.


    Direct3D 11.3
    First and foremost then, Microsoft has announced that there will be a new version of Direct3D 11 coinciding with Direct3D 12. Dubbed Direct3D 11.3, this new version of Direct3D is a continuation of the development and evolution of the Direct3D 11 API and like the previous point updates will be adding API support for features found in upcoming hardware.


    At first glance the announcement of Direct3D 11.3 would appear to be at odds with Microsoft’s development work on Direct3D 12, but in reality there is a lot of sense in this announcement. Direct3D 12 is a low level API – powerful, but difficult to master and very dangerous in the hands of inexperienced programmers. The development model envisioned for Direct3D 12 is that a limited number of code gurus will be the ones writing the engines and renderers that target the new API, while everyone else will build on top of these engines. This works well for the many organizations that are licensing engines such as UE4, or for the smaller number of organizations that can justify having such experienced programmers on staff.


    However for these reasons a low level API is not suitable for everyone. High level APIs such as Direct3D 11 do exist for a good reason after all; their abstraction not only hides the quirks of the underlying hardware, but it makes development easier and more accessible as well. For these reasons there is a need to offer both high level and low level APIs. Direct3D 12 will be the low level API, and Direct3D 11 will continue to be developed to offer the same features through a high level API.


    Direct3D 12
    Today’s announcement of Direct3D 11.3 and the new features set that Direct3D 11.3 and 12 will be sharing will have an impact on Direct3D 12 as well. We’ll get to the new features in a moment, but at a high level it should be noted that this means that Direct3D 12 is going to end up being a multi-generational (multi-feature level) API similar to Direct3D 11.


    In Direct3D 11 Microsoft introduced feature levels, which allowed programmers to target different generations of hardware using the same API, instead of having to write their code multiple times for each associated API generation. In practice this meant that programmers could target D3D 9, 10, and 11 hardware through the D3D 11 API, restricting their feature use accordingly to match the hardware capabilities. This functionality was exposed through feature levels (ex: FL9_3 for D3D9.0c capable hardware) which offered programmers a neat segmentation of feature sets and requirements.


    Direct3D 12 in turn will also be making use of feature levels, allowing developers to exploit the benefits of the low level nature of the API while being able to target multiple generations of hardware. It’s through this mechanism that Direct3D 12 will be usable on GPUs as old as NVIDIA’s Fermi family or as new as their Maxwell family, all the while still being able to utilize the features added in newer generations.


    Ultimately for users this means they will need to be mindful of feature levels, just as they are today with Direct3D 11. Hardware that is Direct3D 12 compatible does not mean it supports all of the latest feature sets, and keeping track of feature set compatibility for each generation of hardware will still be important going forward.


    11.3 & 12: New Features
    Getting to the heart of today’s announcement from Microsoft, we have the newly announced features that will be coming to Direct3D 11.3 and 12. It should be noted at this point in time this is not an exhaustive list of all of the new features that we will see, and Microsoft is still working to define a new feature level to go with them (in the interim they will be accessed through cap bits), but none the less this is our first detailed view at what are expected to be the major new features of 11.3/12


    Rasterizer Ordered Views
    First and foremost of the new features is Rasterizer Ordered Views (ROVs). As hinted at by the name, ROVs is focused on giving the developer control over the order that elements are rasterized in a scene, so that elements are drawn in the correct order. This feature specifically applies to Unordered Access Views (UAVs) being generated by pixel shaders, which buy their very definition are initially unordered. ROVs offers an alternative to UAV's unordered nature, which would result in elements being rasterized simply in the order they were finished. For most rendering tasks unordered rasterization is fine (deeper elements would be occluded anyhow), but for a certain category of tasks having the ability to efficiently control the access order to a UAV is important to correctly render a scene quickly.






    The textbook use case for ROVs is Order Independent Transparency, which allows for elements to be rendered in any order and still blended together correctly in the final result. OIT is not new – Direct3D 11 gave the API enough flexibility to accomplish this task – however these earlier OIT implementations would be very slow due to sorting, restricting their usefulness outside of CAD/CAM. The ROV implementation however could accomplish the same task much more quickly by getting the order correct from the start, as opposed to having to sort results after the fact.


    Along these lines, since OIT is just a specialized case of a pixel blending operation, ROVs will also be usable for other tasks that require controlled pixel blending, including certain cases of anti-aliasing.


    Typed UAV Load







    The second feature coming to Direct3D is Typed UAV Load. Unordered Access Views (UAVs) are a special type of buffer that allows multiple GPU threads to access the same buffer simultaneously without generating memory conflicts. Because of this disorganized nature of UAVs, certain restrictions are in place that Typed UAV Load will address. As implied by the name, Typed UAV Load deals with cases where UAVs are data typed, and how to better handle their use.


    Volume Tiled Resources







    The third feature coming to Direct3D is Volume Tiled Resources. VTR builds off of the work Microsoft and partners have already done for tiled resources (AKA sparse allocation, AKA hardware megatexture) by extending it into the 3rd dimension.


    VTRs are primarily meant to be used with volumetric pixels (voxels), with the idea being that with sparse allocation, volume tiles that do not contain any useful information can avoid being allocated, avoiding tying up memory in tiles that will never be used or accessed. This kind of sparse allocation is necessary to make certain kinds of voxel techniques viable.


    Conservative Rasterization







    Last but certainly not least among Direct3D’s new features will be conservative rasterization. Conservative rasterization is essentially a more accurate but performance intensive solution to figuring out whether a polygon covers part of a pixel. Instead of doing a quick and simple test to see if the center of the pixel is bounded by the lines of the polygon, conservative rasterization checks whether the pixel covers the polygon by testing it against the corners of the pixel. This means that conservative rasterization will catch cases where a polygon was too small to cover the center of a pixel, which results in a more accurate outcome, be it better identifying pixels a polygon resides in, or finding polygons too small to cover the center of any pixel at all. This in turn being where the “conservative” aspect of the name comes from, as a rasterizer would be conservative by including every pixel touched by a triangle as opposed to just the pixels where the tringle covers the center point.


    Conservative rasterization is being added to Direct3D in order to allow new algorithms to be used which would fail under the imprecise nature of point sampling. Like VTR, voxels play a big part here as conservative rasterization can be used to build a voxel. However it also has use cases in more accurate tiling and even collision detection.


    Final Words
    Wrapping things up, today’s announcement of Direct3D 11.3 and its new features offers a solid roadmap for both the evolution of Direct3D and the hardware that will support it. By confirming that they are continuing to work on Direct3D 11 Microsoft has answered one of the lingering questions surrounding Direct3D 12 – what happens to Direct3D 11 – and at the same time this highlights the hardware features that the next generation of hardware will need to support in order to be compliant with the latest D3D feature level. And with Direct3D 12 set to be released sometime next year, these new features won’t be too far off either.

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    11.3? Hum...

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    Tech Mestre Avatar de Winjer
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    Acaba por ser um Directx com acesso ás mesmas features de hardware que o Directx12, mas sem o acesso low level do DX12.
    O DX12 vai ser complicado para pessoal menos experiente ou estúdios que tenham menos recursos. Assim, o DX11.3 permite a simplicidade de uma API de alto nível ao mesmo tempo que permite acesso ao mesmo hardware.

    Será de esperar que motores gráficos como o UE4, o CryEngine, o Frostbite, entre outros de topo, usem o DirectX 12.

  12. #12
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    Eu não sei mesmo se o 11.3 não acaba por sair para a Xbox One, visto que o GPU dela é DX 11. Aliás o 11.3 pode vir mesmo a sair para todas as gráficas DX 11 e o 12 só sai para as que vem nativamente com ele.

  13. #13
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
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    Estas a esquecer-te que tanto AMD como nVidia disseram que as gerações anteriores eram compativeis com o DX12, nao vou enumerar quais, essa info anda qui para o forum.
    Tecnicamente todas as graficas DX 11 vão ser DX 12 salvo um outra coisa mais especifica que estes novis gpus tragam a mais para essas features.
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  14. #14
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    Pois.

    O 11.3 deve sair para o 8.1 e 7 (se sair antes do fim do suporte mainstream ao 7 que acaba em Janeiro, se não sai só para o 8.1) e o 12 deve sair para o 9, digo eu.
    Última edição de Turtolius : 19-09-14 às 13:24

  15. #15
    Tech Mestre Avatar de Winjer
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    O DirectX 11.3 trás um conjunto de features novas que o hardware que equipa a Xbox One não possui. Ao contrário do DX 11.2 que tinha um conjunto de features implementadas por software, o DX 11.3 requer hardware compatível.

    A Xbox One e as gráficas da geração kepler e tahiti serão compatíveis com o DirectX12, mas não totalmente. Irão continuar a ter acesso a uma API low level, de alto desempenho, mas sem as features de hardware que foram anunciadas agora.

 

 
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