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  1. #16
    Moderador Avatar de Winjer
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    Se não fosse o preço elevado das Iomega Zip, podiam ter sido o padrão durante uns bons anos.

  2. #17
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
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    Nem digas nada, aquilo era caro apara chuchu.
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  3. #18
    O Administrador Avatar de LPC
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    Citação Post Original de Jorge-Vieira Ver Post
    E acima disso apareceram as Iomega Zip com uns espantosos 100Mb, top na altura
    Boas!
    Ainda tenho uma externa na garagem...

    Era tudo bem caro... a unidade e as disketes Zip...

    Cumprimentos,

    LPC

    My Specs:
    Case: Phanteks Eclipse P400S - CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 - 2400G - Board: MSI B450 Gaming Pro Carbon AC - RAM: 16GB DDR4 G.Skill RipJaws V 3200Mhz CAS 14-14-14-34 (2x8GB) - GPU: AMD IGPU VEGA 11
    Cooling: Arctic Cooling 3x F14 Silent - CPU Cooler: Arctic Cooling: Liquid Freezer 360 (6xF12 Fans) - Storage: Samsung SSD 840 EVO 1 TB - PSU: EVGA G3 750W - Monitor: ACER XB270HU 1440p @ 144hz G-Sync

  4. #19
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
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    So long, transistor: How the 'memristor' could revolutionize electronics

    (CNN)In 1971, a physicist conceptualized the existence of a fourth fundamental element in the electronic circuit, besides the three that were already in use at the time.

    His name was Leon Chua and he believed -- for reasons of symmetry -- that an extra component could one day be constructed to join the resistor, the capacitor and the inductor.
    He called it "memristor", a portmanteau of the words memory and resistor.
    It took 37 years for our engineering abilities to catch up with that idea: the first memristor was built by Hewlett Packard in 2008.
    And today, many researchers believe it could spark a revolution in computing.










    The component that will change the world of electronics 03:39

    From electrons to ions

    Simply put, the memristor could mean the end of electronics as we know it and the beginning of a new era called "ionics".
    The transistor, developed in 1947, is the main component of computer chips. It functions using a flow of electrons, whereas the memristor couples the electrons with ions, or electrically charged atoms.
    In a transistor, once the flow of electrons is interrupted by, say, cutting the power, all information is lost. But a memristor can remember the amount of charge that was flowing through it, and much like a memory stick it will retain the data even when the power is turned off.
    This can pave the way for computers that will instantly turn on and off like a light bulb and never lose data: the RAM, or memory, will no longer be erased when the machine is turned off, without the need to save anything to hard drives as with current technology.
    But memristors have another fundamental difference compared with transistors: they can escape the boundaries of binary code.
    Like a brain

    Initially, the technology will be mostly used to create super-fast memory chips that contain more data and consume less energy. This alone would make regular computers much more powerful, but down the line, the memristor could also take on the processing.
    Jennifer Rupp is a Professor of electrochemical materials at ETH Zurich, and she's working with IBM to built a memristor-based machine within the next two years.
    Memristors, she points out, function in a way that is similar to a human brain: "Unlike a transistor, which is based on binary codes, a memristor can have multi-levels. You could have several states, let's say zero, one half, one quarter, one third, and so on, and that gives us a very powerful new perspective on how our computers may develop in the future," she told CNN's Nick Glass.
    Such a shift in computing methodology would allow us to create "smart" computers that operate in a way reminiscent of the synapses in our brains.
    Free from the limitations of the 0s and 1s, these more powerful computers would be able to learn and make decisions, ultimately getting us one step closer to creating human-like artificial intelligence.
    So long, and thanks for all the code

    Transistors are based on silicon, a rigid material whose properties are used to manage the flow of electrons, and thus information.
    In 1975, Gordon Moore, the co-founder of Intel, formulated a famous law which states that the number of transistors in an electronic circuit doubles approximately every two years.
    This has so far proven accurate and set the pace for the constant increase in computing power, but the trend might soon come to an end.
    There is a physical limit to the number of transistors that we can pack on a chip, and we are already approaching the miniaturization threshold of this technology. It is inevitable that, one day, we will need to move away from silicon based computing.
    The memristor technology is a candidate for this crucial step: "It could mean the end of the silicon era, giving us lower power consumption, the ability to compute more information, increased data storage and completely new logic patterns for our computers," says Rupp.
    Memristors don't require a silicon layer and different materials can be used as a substrate. This could create a new class of microchips, that could eventually be integrated in everyday items such as windows, clothes or even coffee cups.
    The race is on

    After manufacturing the first ever memristor, Hewlett Packard has been working for years on a new type of computer based on the technology. According to plans, it will launch by 2020.
    Simply called "The Machine", it uses "electrons for processing, photons for communication, and ions for storage."
    "I think there is a race going on," says Rupp. "There is a strong driving force, but at the same time it's very important that there are players like HP, because they want to get to the market, show everyone that this is real."
    At the moment, manufacturing costs are still high, but the benefits are worth it: "Memristors operate at a lower power consumption, with a faster speed, and with a higher volume density of information than anything we have based on silicon microchip transistors," Rupp told CNN.
    Much like a particle in the realm of physics, the existence of the memristor was theorized long before we could actually build one.
    Now that we have that capability to manufacture it, the "missing fourth element" of electronics -- despite its less than catchy name -- might be the key to many further human discoveries.
    Noticia:
    http://edition.cnn.com/2015/02/26/te...or/index.html#
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  5. #20
    Moderador Avatar de Winjer
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    Um exemplo dos primeiros CGI usados em TV.


  6. #21
    Moderador Avatar de Winjer
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    Um belo video do LGR, com muita nostalgia pelo meio.


  7. #22
    O Administrador Avatar de LPC
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    Citação Post Original de Horus-Anhur Ver Post
    Um belo video do LGR, com muita nostalgia pelo meio.

    Boas!
    Excelente video mesmo!

    Faltou ai o Sinclair e o Commodore AMIGA, teve no entanto o AMSTRAD!

    Para quem percorreu esse "memory lane" é sempre bom rever esses equipamentos, as disquetes finas e depois as grossas... as de baixa densidade as de alta densidade... etc...
    É quase a mesma coisa que a associação da caneca BIC e um cassete áudio... Só quem passou por essa geração (e eu tive ainda alguns walkmans) sabe para que é que servia!

    Cumprimentos,

    LPC

    My Specs:
    Case: Phanteks Eclipse P400S - CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 - 2400G - Board: MSI B450 Gaming Pro Carbon AC - RAM: 16GB DDR4 G.Skill RipJaws V 3200Mhz CAS 14-14-14-34 (2x8GB) - GPU: AMD IGPU VEGA 11
    Cooling: Arctic Cooling 3x F14 Silent - CPU Cooler: Arctic Cooling: Liquid Freezer 360 (6xF12 Fans) - Storage: Samsung SSD 840 EVO 1 TB - PSU: EVGA G3 750W - Monitor: ACER XB270HU 1440p @ 144hz G-Sync

  8. #23
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
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    Muito bom esse video, carregado de boa nostalgia.
    Faltam só alguns pormenores como referiu o LPC.
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  9. #24
    Moderador Avatar de Winjer
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  10. #25
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
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    National Museum of Computing Summer Bytes Festival begins

    The National Museum of Computing's (TNMOC) Summer Bytes Festival will begin this Saturday and run until the end of August. The festival, which will take place in the Bletchley Park museum's Block H, will be open for attendees every afternoon during the month, from 12 noon until 5pm.
    Summer Bytes will present attendees the delights of computing past, present and future with plenty of scope for hands-on opportunities and a host of pop-up events, at this Bloomberg-sponsored show. The festival will take place in Block H, the home of Colossus. Among the attractions will be retro computer games, competitions, and a brand new Air Traffic Control simulation.

    The list of pop-up events through August includes the following:

    • Who is Listening? – use vintage 1970s equipment to find hidden surveillance bugs in the library of The National Museum of Computing.
    • Women in Computing – special tours highlighting great achievements of women in technology.
    • Meet the MicroBit – the BBC's MicroBit will be there to play with – and you can compare it to that wonder machine of the 1980s – the Beeb, BBC Micro.
    • Coding the BBC micro – with opportunities to code using today’s web-based resources.
    • Code breaking – learn how to encrypt and decrypt your own codes and ciphers in a drop in workshop.
    • Enigma and friends – get hands-on with famous wartime machines like the Enigma and more.
    • Play the brand new Elite: Dangerous – you can even compare it to the original famous 1980's BBC Micro Elite game.
    • Build your own App – a drop in workshop to build your own app with App Inventor.
    • Daytime Astronomy – stargaze in broad daylight. It gets more popular each year.
    • Techno Sound – get digital and creative with computer sounds and music
    • See the core of Apple - Apple technology from the 1980s to today
    • Plus, the Lego room with robots

    Some of the pop up events will vary from day-to-day during the month, so if there is a particular event you are interested in, and wouldn't want to miss, please check the full listing, with dates, on the Summer Bytes Festival web site.

    Beyond the above special attractions potential visitors shouldn't forget the regular appeal of a visit to TNMOC, as it houses "the world's largest collection of functional historic computers," including the rebuilt Colossus, the world's first electronic computer, and the WITCH, the world's oldest working digital computer, pictured below.

    Noticia:
    http://hexus.net/ce/news/general/850...stival-begins/
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  11. #26
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
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    Then and Now: A decade of Intel CPUs compared, from Conroe to Haswell

    It's hard to believe 15 years have passed since I tested the Pentium 4 series for the first time. At this point I honestly don't remember many of my experiences with the P4 range, if not because of its age then because it was a pretty rubbish series. I do have many fond memories of testing the Core 2 Duo series however.
    Six long years after the Pentium 4, we reviewed the first generation Core 2 Duo processors with the dual-core E6000 range and then the quad-core models a year later. To this day the Core 2 Quad Q6600 might be the most popular enthusiast processor we've seen. In fact, almost all Core 2 Duo and Core 2 Quad chips were notoriously good overclockers and many users still claim to be running overclocked LGA775 processors.

    Today we are going to take a look back at the Core 2 CPUs and compare them to the current generation Haswell Celeron, Pentium, Core i3, Core i5 and Core i7 parts.
    Along the way we will be testing processors such as the 2009/2010 Nehalem Core i5-760 and Core i7-870, as well as the Core i5-2500K and Core i7-2700K Sandy Bridge chips, comprising almost 10 years of Intel mainstream CPUs.
    Year Process Price Base / Turbo Cores / Threads Socket
    Core i7-4790K 2013 22nm $339 4.0GHz / 4.4GHz 4 / 8 LGA1150
    Core i5-4670K 2013 22nm $242 3.5GHz / 3.9GHz 4 / 4 LGA1150
    Core i3-4350 2013 22nm $138 3.6GHz 2 / 4 LGA1150
    Pentium G3220 2013 22nm $64 3.0GHz 2 / 2 LGA1150
    Celeron G1820 2014 22nm $42 2.7GHz 2 / 2 LGA1150
    Core i7-2700K 2011 32nm $332 3.5GHz / 3.9GHz 4 / 8 LGA1155
    Core i5-2500K 2011 32nm $216 3.3GHz / 3.7GHz 4 / 4 LGA1155
    Core i7-870 2009 45nm $562 2.93GHz / 3.6GHz 4 / 8 LGA1156
    Core i5-760 2009 45nm $205 2.8GHz / 3.33GHz 4 / 4 LGA1156
    Core 2 Quad Q9650 2008 45nm $530 3.0GHz 4 / 4 LGA775
    Core 2 Quad Q6600 2007 65nm $530 2.4GHz 4 / 4 LGA775
    Core 2 Duo E8600 2008 45nm $266 3.33GHz 2 / 2 LGA775
    Core 2 Duo E6600 2006 65nm $316 2.4GHz 2 / 2 LGA775
    The only mainstream processor series missing is the Ivy Bridge architecture, though we decided to skip it as the performance leap from Sandy Bridge to Haswell wasn't significant. Fifth-generation Broadwell processors are also missing as they are not available yet and with Skylake arriving soon it seems this series is being skipped entirely.
    Obviously today's processors are going to be faster than those that are almost a decade old. What we feel is of interest is finding out just how much faster they are in modern applications such as Photoshop CC, x264 HD encoding, and Excel workloads. We'll also look at gaming performance, albeit with an unrealistically powerful discrete GPU that we could've only dreamed of a decade ago.
    Finishing up the benchmark phase we'll also compare power consumption to gauge how much more efficient modern day CPUs really are.
    System Specs & Memory Bandwidth Performance

    Haswell System Specs

    • Intel Core i7-4790K (4.0GHz - 4.4GHz)
    • Intel Core i5-4670K (3.4GHz - 3.8GHz)
    • Intel Core i3-4350 (3.6GHz)
    • Intel Pentium G3220 (3.0GHz)
    • Intel Celeron G1820 (2.7GHz)
    • Asrock Z97 Extreme6
    • 8GB DDR3-2400 RAM
    • GeForce GTX 980
    • Crucial MX200 1TB
    • SilverStone Essential Gold 750w
    • Windows 8.1 Pro 64-bit
    Sandy Bridge System Specs

    • Intel Core i7-2700K (3.5GHz - 3.90GHz)
    • Intel Core i5-2500K (3.3GHz - 3.7GHz)
    • Asrock Z77 Extreme9
    • 8GB DDR3-2400 RAM
    • GeForce GTX 980
    • Crucial MX200 1TB
    • SilverStone Essential Gold 750w
    • Windows 8.1 Pro 64-bit
    Lynnfield System Specs

    • Intel Core i7-870 (2.93GHz - 3.6GHz)
    • Intel Core i5-760 (2.8GHz - 3.33GHz)
    • Asrock P55 Deluxe3
    • 8GB DDR3-2133 RAM
    • GeForce GTX 980
    • Crucial MX200 1TB
    • SilverStone Essential Gold 750w
    • Windows 8.1 Pro 64-bit
    Core 2 System Specs

    • Core 2 Quad Q9650 (3GHz)
    • Core 2 Quad Q6600 (2.4GHz)
    • Core 2 Duo E8600 (3.33GHz)
    • Core 2 Duo E6600 (2.4GHz)
    • Gigabyte EP45T-Extreme
    • 4GB DDR3-1066 RAM
    • GeForce GTX 980
    • Crucial MX200 1TB
    • SilverStone Essential Gold 750w
    • Windows 8.1 Pro 64-bit
    The Core 2 series wasn't blessed with big memory bandwidths and back in the day AMD had one over Intel here with its Athlon64 range which peaked at around 9GB/s. As you can see below, we struggled to get 7GB/s out of the Core 2 Duo E8600 and Core 2 Quad Q9650.

    The jump from the Core 2 range to the first Core i5 and Core i7 processors was massive as the i5-760 managed 17.1GB/s and 19.2GB/s for the i7-870. The Sandy Bridge Core i5 and Core i7 processors didn't improve on this with roughly 18GB/s.
    However, by the time Haswell came around Intel was pushing well over 20GB/s on this mainstream platform. This means even the cheapest Haswell desktop processor has roughly 4x the memory bandwidth available when compared to the fastest Core 2 processors.
    Toda a analise:
    http://www.techspot.com/article/1039...-cpu-compared/


    Um artigo bem interessante que mostra a evolução do poder computacional nesta ultima decada dos CPUs Intel
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  12. #27
    Tech Membro Avatar de Crack
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    muito interessante essa tabela

  13. #28
    O homem das Babes! Avatar de RCS_007
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    Uma coisa interessante é o consumo de um Core i5 ou i7 comparado a um core 2 duo ou quad.
    Eu a pensar que o meu 3570 ia consumir um bocado mais mas não, o filho da mãe nem passa dos 32º a navegar na net etc.


  14. #29
    Tech Bencher Avatar de reiszink
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    Em certos jogos, passar de quad 775 para quad 1150, é dobrar os frames, melhor do que comprar uma gráfica nova.

    E mais uma vez fica provado o excelente valor do 2500K, é um CPU que vai ficar para a história.
    Intel i7 5820K - ASRock X99M Killer - 16GB G.Skill DDR4 - Gigabyte GTX 980Ti G1 - Plextor M6e 256GB + Samsung 850 EVO 500GB - Corsair H110 - EVGA G3 750W - Acer 27" 144Hz IPS - Zowie EC2-A - Filco Majestouch 2 TKL - HyperX Cloud II Pro

  15. #30
    O homem das Babes! Avatar de RCS_007
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    Concordo.
    Quanto ao CPU, o i5 2500K e o Core 2 Quad Q6600 que ainda hoje muitos o usam, para mim foram os "best of" da Intel.


 

 

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