Registar
Página 1 de 71 1231151 ... ÚltimoÚltimo
Resultados 1 a 15 de 1063
  1. #1
    Tech Mestre Avatar de Winjer
    Registo
    Feb 2013
    Local
    Santo Tirso
    Posts
    8,521
    Avaliação
    3 (100%)

    Tópico da ciência

    Sempre que há uma noticia interessante sobe ciência o pessoal coloca-a na conversa da treta, o que significa que assuntos sérios e interessantes ficam pelo meio de tretas.......

    Para organizar as coisas melhor, achei bem criar um tópico apenas para noticias sobre ciência.

    Cá fica a primeira, uma nova descoberta do LHC: a confirmação da existência de duas novas partículas.
    Graças ao LHC e á Philae, estamos a viver em tempos muito interessantes na perspectiva cientifica.

    http://Scientists at the Large Hadro...sive particles

    Clearly, we still have a lot more to learn about the universe: The Large Hadron Collider, famed for its discovery of the Higgs boson, has discovered two new subatomic particles. Known as Xi_b’-and Xi_b*-, the two particles had previously been predicted to exist by the formidable hypothesizing powers of particle physicists, and now they have been observed and confirmed by CERN’s LHCb team. These new particles have six times the mass of the (already very heavy) proton, and according to CERN this discovery could point us towards “new physics beyond the Standard Model,” which would be rather exciting indeed.First, let’s talk about those amazing names: Xi_b’- and Xi_b*-. The first is pronounced ZAI-bee-minus, the second is ZAI-bee-star-minus. I’m actually not sure how you pronounce the inverted comma in the first particle (if you’re a particle physicist, please let me know in the comments). As their names imply, both particles are almost identical — they each consist of a down quark, a strange quark, and a beauty/bottom quark — but the spins of the down and strange quarks are slightly different, resulting in slightly different masses (5.935 GeV vs. 5.955 GeV).
    Part of the LHCb detector. (The image at the top is a close-up of LHCb.)

    These two new particles join the rather long list of observed Xi baryons, the even longer list of baryons (which contains any particle made up of any three quarks), and thus the huge family of hadrons (which also includes mesons, another family of subatomic particles that contain one quark and one antiquark). While there are only 17 known fundamental particles in the Standard Model (the beauty quark, the Higgs boson, the electron, etc.) these particles are predicted to combine into hundreds of other composite particles. By smashing atoms together with particle accelerators (like the LHC), we have managed to glimpse many of these composite particles, usually as they quickly decay into fundamental particles — but many more are still to be officially discovered.
    Read: We already have a perfect, planet-sized dark matter detector: The constellation of GPS satellites
    The 17-mile-long LHC, showing the location of the four main detectors

    In this case, the two new Xi baryons were discovered by the LHCb experiment, one of the LHC’s seven hyper-sensitive particle detectors. As the name implies, LHCb is specially tuned to detect hadrons that contain a bottom quark (some scientists tried to popularize “beauty” when the particle was first discovered, but “bottom” is predominantly used nowadays). The ATLAS and CMS detectors were behind the discovery of the Higgs boson, but there’s also ALICE, LHCf, TOTEM, and MoEDAL. Earlier this year, the LHCb also discovered a new type of matter — exotic hadrons — with, highly unusually, appear to be made of four quarks instead of three.
    As for the significance of LHCb’s discovery of Xi_b’- and Xi_b*-, or exotic hadrons for that matter, the particle physicist jury is still out. For the most part, most of these experiments seem to be about confirming hypotheses that have been predicted by the Standard Model — hypotheses that are in some cases decades old. Speaking about the discovery, the LHCb’s Patrick Koppenburg said, “If we want to find new physics beyond the Standard Model, we need first to have a sharp picture. Such high precision studies will help us to differentiate between Standard Model effects and anything new or unexpected in the future.” Not exactly the most heavy-hitting remarks for the discovery of new particles, but it gives you some idea of just how far down the rabbit hole our physicists are — they’re focused so tightly that the bigger picture is a blur.

  2. #2

  3. #3
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
    Registo
    Nov 2013
    Local
    City 17
    Posts
    30,005
    Avaliação
    1 (100%)
    Já coloquei hoje no topico da conversa da treta, mas fica aqui novamente.
    Na proxima segunda-feira ás 21H de PT, passa no Discovery Channel um documentario sobre a sonda que aterrou no cometa.

    Imperdivel para quem gosta destes assuntos e ver toda tecnologia e ciencia colocada num projecto daquela dimensão.
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  4. #4
    Tech Mestre Avatar de Winjer
    Registo
    Feb 2013
    Local
    Santo Tirso
    Posts
    8,521
    Avaliação
    3 (100%)
    Citação Post Original de Viriat0 Ver Post
    Boa Thread!!

    Deixo um canal muito bom que sigo no Youtube.
    Boa partilha, ainda não conhecia esse canal, mas agora já está nas minhas subscrições.

    Deixo aqui alguns canais que costumo seguir, sobre ciência.

    Veritasium: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHn...RG1u-2MsSQLbXA
    ASAP Science: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCC5...nyi_tk2BudLUzA
    Big Think: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvQ...DE2i6aCoMnS-Vg
    VSauce: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6n...TCZ5t-N3Rm3-HA
    Crash Course: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCX6...YBQ0ip5gyeme-Q
    Sci Show: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZY...1of7BRZ86-8fow
    Sci Show Space: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrM...G4Vwqv3t7W9EFg

  5. #5
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
    Registo
    Nov 2013
    Local
    City 17
    Posts
    30,005
    Avaliação
    1 (100%)
    SanDisk Fusion ioMemory SSDs used in CERN supercomputing projects

    Supercomputing 2014: The quest to understand the building blocks of the universe requires intense computing power, which in turn requires some of the fastest storage solutions available. CERN's Large Hadron Collider, which discovered the Higgs boson in 2012, will begin colliding elements with the most energy ever achieved in a particle accelerator in 2015. This requires transmitting 170 petabytes datasets to far-flung research centers around the world. The University of Michigan and University of Victoria are utilizing SanDisk's Fusion ioMemory solutions to handle the influx of data at their multi-site supercomputing project.


    The universities need to create a data transfer architecture with the capability to transfer figures across 100 computing centers at 100Gb/s speeds. This isn't typically a huge problem if there is a distributed architecture, but this particular deployment needs to provide that capability from a single server. SanDisk Fusion ioMemory products are stepping in to fulfil the extreme performance requirements, and they are demonstrating a data transfer from the University of Victoria campus to the WAN in the University of Michigan booth (#3569) at the Supercomputing 2014 conference.

    Noticia completa:
    http://www.tweaktown.com/news/41280/...cts/index.html

    SSDs para ajudar no campo da investigação atomica e da particula que gerou o Universo.
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  6. #6

  7. #7
    Tech Membro Avatar de MAXLD
    Registo
    Mar 2013
    Local
    C.Branco
    Posts
    2,326
    Avaliação
    0
    Citação Post Original de Viriat0 Ver Post
    Boa Thread!!

    Deixo um canal muito bom que sigo no Youtube.


    Ficam os outros do Brady também:

    - Física: https://www.youtube.com/user/sixtysymbols
    - Números: https://www.youtube.com/user/numberphile
    - Informática: https://www.youtube.com/user/Computerphile
    outros:
    http://www.bradyharan.com/

    includindo o meu favorito: - Deep Sky Videos: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCo-...PmQSQL_L6Lx1_w


  8. #8
    Tech Mestre Avatar de Winjer
    Registo
    Feb 2013
    Local
    Santo Tirso
    Posts
    8,521
    Avaliação
    3 (100%)

  9. #9
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
    Registo
    Nov 2013
    Local
    City 17
    Posts
    30,005
    Avaliação
    1 (100%)
    Som da aterragem da sonda Philae no cometa.

    The Sound Of The First Comet Landing
    Link para ouvir a gravação:
    http://www.hardocp.com/news/2014/11/...g#.VG7fQaip3MJ
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  10. #10
    Tech Mestre Avatar de Winjer
    Registo
    Feb 2013
    Local
    Santo Tirso
    Posts
    8,521
    Avaliação
    3 (100%)
    Estava à espera de ouvir um alien a gritar de medo.

  11. #11
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
    Registo
    Nov 2013
    Local
    City 17
    Posts
    30,005
    Avaliação
    1 (100%)
    Ainda gostava de saber como aquela gravação foi feita, sabendo que não existe atmosfera para propagar o som.
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  12. #12
    Tech Mestre Avatar de Winjer
    Registo
    Feb 2013
    Local
    Santo Tirso
    Posts
    8,521
    Avaliação
    3 (100%)
    Dentro da sonda há ar.

  13. #13
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
    Registo
    Nov 2013
    Local
    City 17
    Posts
    30,005
    Avaliação
    1 (100%)
    Não deve ser ar, deve ser algum gás inerte.
    O ar a baixas temperaturas congela, devido à molecula da água.
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  14. #14
    Tech Veterano Avatar de Viriat0
    Registo
    May 2014
    Local
    LPPT
    Posts
    4,702
    Avaliação
    7 (100%)
    Citação Post Original de Jorge-Vieira Ver Post
    Não deve ser ar, deve ser algum gás inerte.
    O ar a baixas temperaturas congela, devido à molecula da água.
    As condições na Exosfera devem ser outras.

  15. #15
    Tech Membro Avatar de MAXLD
    Registo
    Mar 2013
    Local
    C.Branco
    Posts
    2,326
    Avaliação
    0
    O que eles fazem quando mostram estes sons do Espaço é pegar a gama de frequências electromagnéticas captadas e converter para o espectro da audição humana.

    É o mesmo que as imagens das galáxias que vemos por aí. Olhando para lá com os nossos olhos, não se vêm aquelas cores todas tão bonitas e detalhadas. O que eles fazem é captar uma série de fotos com diferentes filtros e em diferentes espectros (incluindo infravermelhos e ultravioleta) detectando melhor os detalhes e que tipo de elementos existem. E depois para fazer uma imagem completa para o público, sobrepõem-nas, e artificalmente usam as cores humanamente visíveis para realçar melhor os diferentes elementos abundantes por lá (Hidrogénio, Oxigénio, ...) para que tenhamos uma melhor percepção do que existe lá.


    Para ter uma ideia,
    espectro electromagnético (Frequências):

    Última edição de MAXLD : 21-11-14 às 15:26

 

 
Página 1 de 71 1231151 ... ÚltimoÚltimo

Informação da Thread

Users Browsing this Thread

Estão neste momento 1 users a ver esta thread. (0 membros e 1 visitantes)

Bookmarks

Regras

  • Você Não Poderá criar novos Tópicos
  • Você Não Poderá colocar Respostas
  • Você Não Poderá colocar Anexos
  • Você Não Pode Editar os seus Posts
  •