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  1. #31
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
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    O problema é que os concorrentes da AMD também vão utilizar algumas dessas techs... e sem guito para investir será a AMD capaz de fazer melhor?
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  2. #32
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
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    Exclusive: AMD Aggressively Pursuing Performance/Watt for FinFET Generation of dGPUs in 2016, Will Increase Focus on Power Saving – Vega10 Codename Spotted

    A source close to AMD recently offered some details to WCCFTech regarding the company’s future plans; plans which include the upcoming generation of GPUs as well as next gen consoles. The next generation of AMD graphic cards will be based on FinFETs (either 14nm or 16nm) and will offer roughly twice the performance over the 28nm generation. The information we received not only confirms previously revealed codenames but also sheds light on a brand new one: Vega10. It also states that AMD will be focusing on power saving alot during the next generation.
    A slide describing GCN goals from the Financial Analyst Day press deck. @AMD Public Domain
    AMD to increase focus on power saving with the FinFET generation of GPUs as well as the software side of Radeon

    Lets go over the codenames we know so far. We know that the next generation flagship will be called Greenland with the high and mid end offerings being Ellesmere and Baffin. We also know that these GPUs recently taped out, as revealed by an exec’s linkedin profile. We are now adding another codename to the mix – namely “Vega10”. Ellesmere and Baffin have been mentioned close togather in AMD’s internal documents and Vega10 has been mentioned similarly alongside Greenland. This leads us to believe that Vega10 might be a derivative or a superlative of the Greenland die. It could also be a power efficient version of the same (rather like the R9 Nano). One thing is for sure, ‘Ellesmere/Baffin’ and ‘Vega10/Greenland’ will target different market segments.




    Another thing our source mentioned was that AMD will be increasing its focus on ISVs and Software in 2016 and 2017. This means new initiatives and polishing existing software. Part of this can already be seen by the new Radeon Crimson drivers and it looks like there is more in the pipeline. A good guess (caution: speculation) on what might be coming includes VR, since that is pretty much the new killer app (or rather killer-field) for gaming nowadays. You might remember that AMD has been increasing focus on virtual reality with its LiquidVR dev kit.
    Lastly, it looks like AMD will be giving special attention to power saving in the next generation – an initiative it started with Tonga, continued with the R9 Nano and will probably perfect with the FinFET generation of GPUs. This could mean that we can expect more power efficient variants – in the mainstream as well as enthusiast market segments. Infact, AMD is counting on this very fact and is pretty confident on design wins for Ellesmere and Baffin – which should target the performance market. The source further mentions that the company is very pleased about the transition to DirectX 12 and Vulkan – claiming it to be a game changer and very good for Radeons and FirePros in the long run. The new low level APIs should truly help leverage the power of AMD’s GCN and improve Radeon and FirePro positioning as (relatively) future proof GPUs.
    While this information doesn’t mention anything explicit (except the Vega10 codename) it does give us a very good idea of what to expect from AMD. Not only is the company increasing its focus on power efficiency, it will also be working on the software side of things. Radeon Crimson drivers were a much welcomed change and I am sure whatever the company has in the pipeline will be met with great gusto. The transition from 28nm to 14nm/16nm FinFET will naturally result in double the performance/watt and AMD will be looking to leverage this to further its own unique position in the dGPU market.

    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  3. #33
    Master Business & GPU Man Avatar de Enzo
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    E quando.........
    Devido à falta de espaço na assinatura, resolvi colocar em "Acerca de mim" os meus projectos]
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/member.php?u=801

  4. #34
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
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    AMD Raja Koduri Promises Two Brand New GCN GPUs in 2016 Based on FinFET Process – Focusing Discrete GPU Market Share Gains in 2016 – 2017

    AMD seems to be working hard to get their next generation of GCN powered discrete graphics chips out in 2016. Just yesterday, we covered some great details regarding AMD’s 2016 GPU strategy as the company is eyeing for rigorous performance/watt improvements in the latest GCN (Graphics Core Next) architecture and designs for their upcoming discrete GPUs. The details we share do give some insight on AMD’s plans for the upcoming year but more or less, it confirms that the GPU makers are finally shifting from the current 28nm process to the latest 16/14nm FinFET process.

    AMD’s Raja Koduri Spills The Beans – Two Brand New GCN GPUs Arriving in 2016

    While AMD is keeping their lips sealed regarding their 2016 GCN plans, head of the graphics division at AMD’s Radeon Technologies Group, Raja Koduri, spilled the beans during a chat with Forbes (Source: Forbes). During the brief chat, Raja Koduri confirmed something which we all have been wasting to hear. Raja Koduri confirmed that AMD is launching two brand new GCN GPUs in 2016 which will feature their next generation GCN architecture along with FinFET process technology and the two times energy efficiency which AMD had promised in their slides during the Financial Analyst Day 2015. Now this is a major indication of AMD’s GPU plans for 2016 as the company has promised two brand new GCN GPUs for the upcoming year. Even though we don’t have any information regarding the GPUs mentioned, it is easy to predict that these new GPUs will be powering the high-end enthusiast and the performance sector as AMD has also put a lot of emphasis on “High-Performance” in their previous slides.
    Now the interesting thing is that AMD has two new GPUs set for launch in 2016 which means that they will have to rely on some existing cores to power their mid-range and entry-tier offerings. We might once again take a look at Hawaii, Tonga and Fiji (definitely Fiji has to be part of the Radeon 400 series) in the upcoming graphics lineup from AMD. The Fiji GPU showed that one chip can scale down to several products, from the upcoming Fury X2 down to the high-performance Radeon R9 Fury X, the competitive Radeon R9 Fury and the small form factor focused Radeon R9 Nano. AMD may try to apply the same strategy to their new cores which will make use of HBM2 memory architecture and rumored to feature up to 18 billion transistors and 32 GB of VRAM. The more surprising thing is that we might just see a further revised and price-cut Tonga down in the sub-$200 range along with a further price cut Hawaii if AMD doesn’t plan to replace it all of a sudden with a new GPU offering. Regardless, AMD will have an array of both HBM1/2 and GDDR5 powered solutions for the market.

    Another thing our source mentioned was that AMD will be increasing its focus on ISVs and Software in 2016 and 2017. This means new initiatives and polishing existing software. Part of this can already be seen by the new Radeon Crimson drivers and it looks like there is more in the pipeline. A good guess (caution: speculation) on what might be coming includes VR, since that is pretty much the new killer app (or rather killer-field) for gaming nowadays. You might remember that AMD has been increasing focus on virtual reality with its LiquidVR dev kit. Source



    While this is good news for the enthusiast users, it more or less means that the entry and budget tier markets would be getting current GPUs under a new naming scheme and at a lower price. For the first time since 2013, AMD will have to new GPUs launched in the market aside from the 1 GPU launch which they have done since HD 7000 series (Hawaii in 2013, Tonga in 2014, Fiji in 2015). This does mean that some of the current GPUs that are going to be featured again in the lineup at lower prices will be going against a large array of new GPUs from NVIDIA built on their Pascal GPU architecture with HBM2 and GDDR5 variants. The Pascal GPUs will range from entry level to enthusiast level offerings so it remains to be seen how AMD plans to tackle them with just two new GPUs. Note that there could be several cut-down SKUs of the new AMD GPUs as this strategy like detailed above has not only worked well for AMD and their cards but also for NVIDIA as they have launched several SKU offerings based on either two or three GPU cores (GK104, GK110, GM204).
    AMD Radeon Technologies Group Headed By Roy Taylor – Better Content To Play a Major Role

    AMD is giving the company a major overhaul with the new Radeon Technologies Group as it plans to make Content a key focus to deliver better utilization of their hardware suite. The strategy involves working and building relations with game developers to deliver better performance on their graphics products. AMD’s competitor, NVIDIA, has had major success by enabling their team to work close with game developers in the form of TWIMTBP (The Way It’s Meant To Be Played) initiative which has been going on for years now and green team has had some great success with major AAA title releases as more and more games are optimized for their hardware. AMD’s own Gaming Evolved strategy will be taking a new direction in 2016 with more interaction being made with game developers as they focus on tuning their chips for some major launches in this and upcoming year along with focusing on upcoming graphics trends such as VR (Virtual Reality) and AR which is picking up the pace quite well in the tech world.

    AMD recently announced a farewell to their Catalyst Driver and are bringing the latest AMD Radeon Software driver codenamed Crimson which is being made by the new RTG team as a fresh and new offering for the AMD GPU users. AMD’s hard work also payed off in DirectX 12 as they implement hardware Async support in their GCN powered GPUs and the upcoming cards are going to further leverage from DX12 titles arriving in 2016 and beyond. If all goes as AMD has planned, then they expect to gain some momentum in 2016 and gain some of the discrete graphics market share back from NVIDIA who currently enjoys a 81.9% market share in the discrete graphics card market (as of Q2 2015) and their GPU market has seen record profit in Q3 2015 (FY 2016). The corporate structure at AMD now is far more effective and comprehensive than it had been for the past several years. We should see the dedicated CPU and GPU groups at AMD take on a razor sharp focus and play a much more aggressive role in the PC industry’s perpetual game of chess.
    Next Generation AMD and NVDIA GPUs Comparison (Prediction):








    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  5. #35
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
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    14nm AMD Greenland tapes out: Attack on NVIDIA Pascal, Intel Xeon Phi



    Couple of days ago, GlobalFoundries issued a press release stating that they ‘demonstrated silicon success on the first AMD (NASDAQ: AMD) products using GLOBALFOUNDRIES’ most advanced 14nm FinFET process technology.’
    FinFET technology is expected to play a critical foundational role across multiple AMD product lines, starting in 2016. GLOBALFOUNDRIES has worked tirelessly to reach this key milestone on its 14LPP process. We look forward to GLOBALFOUNDRIES’ continued progress towards full production readiness and expect to leverage the advanced 14LPP process technology across a broad set of our CPU, APU, and GPU products,” said Mark Papermaster, Senior Vice President and Chief Technology Officer at Advanced Micro Devices.
    According to our sources, the company focused and pushed with development of GlobalFoundries 14nm process from the get go. In January 2015, their 14nm process “was successfully qualified for volume production, while achieving yield targets on lead customer products.” Furthermore, “The performance-enhanced version of the technology (14LPP) was qualified in the third quarter of 2015, with the early ramp occurring in the fourth quarter of 2015 and full-scale production set for (early) 2016. Behind the cryptic talk, lies AMD decision to ‘double down’ in its complicated relationship with GlobalFoundries, which went from being great (after all, GlobalFoundries was a spinoff of AMD foundries) to disastrous, when then AMD’s failed CEO Thomas Seifert (now CFO at Symantec) invoked a clause which resulted in a $500 million cash penalty, which AMD had to pay GlobalFoundries, almost bankrupting the company in the process. Luckily for AMD, Thomas was soon shown the door, with Rory Read and latter, Lisa Su getting the post to lead the path of recovery. Raja Koduri is the face behind AMD’s graphics spin-off, Radeon Technology Group.

    So, what did AMD taped out? In a recent conversation with Forbes, Raja Koduri, head of graphics spinoff Radeon Technologies Group (RTG) disclosed that “RTG will need to execute on their architectural designs and create brand new GPUs, something that Advanced Micro Devices has struggled with lately. He promised two brand new GPUs in 2016,” followed by their plan to “make Advanced Micro Devices more power and die size competitive.” Thus, we have at least two GPUs coming from AMD, being mainstream (Baffin / Ellesmere) and high-end (Greenland) members of Arctic Island GPU family, as low-end is now integrated inside AMD’s APU (Accelerated Processing Units). According to unconfirmed rumors, the company also tapped out first prototypes carrying Zen architecture, which is still more than a year away. Given that Zen effectively changes AMD / RTG from top to bottom, it will be interesting to see when the company can deploy multi-TFLOPS APUs based on Zen x86 architecture and Greenland GPU architecture. AMD Goes “Made in America” The ‘double down’ on GlobalFoundries resulted in AMD’s switch from TSMC to GlobalFoundries for its next-generation GPUs, which will utilize a more advanced process node than their main competitor, NVIDIA. Also, AMD has a slight advantage with time zones, as GlobalFoundries developed and deployed then 14nm FinFET process in its Fab 8 facility in New York state, which is where AMD will produce all of the taped out parts. “Diffused in Germany, Made in Malaysia” marking on AMD Fusion A6-3600 APU (first product to do so). All future 14nm processors are expected to carry “Diffused in United States” marking.

    You’ve read it correctly folks. For the first time since 2002, and the spin-off of its Austin factory, AMD will have a “Made in United States” or as AMD likes to put, “Diffused in United States” markings on its chips. Given the advancement of HBM and HBM2 memory in AMD’s lineup, we expect to have “Diffused in United States, Assembled in South Korea” markings on their chips. In the end, key question is – what Greenland GPU will be? Even if Greenland would be nothing more than an improved Fiji GPU in a new process, going from 28nm to 14nm would bring the power down in the 40-50% range. Our sources are saying this is far from being the case, which was confirmed when Lisa Su, CEO of AMD stated: “We are also focused on delivering our next generation GPUs in 2016 which is going to improve performance per watt by two times compared to our current offerings, based on design and architectural enhancements as well as advanced FinFET products process technology.” The statement came during the last quarterly earnings call. AMD Roadmap clearly defines 2016 as the year of adopting the 14nm FinFET process and radical improvement in performance/watt.

    After almost reaching transistor/FLOP parity with Fiji (8.9 billion transistors, 8.6 TFLOPS), Greenland is expected to go pass that mark. We expect to see an 15+ billion transistor part (first 10+ billion monolithic chip in the world), connected to 16 and 32GB HBM2 memory, in single and dual-GPU configuration. The board design comes from what the company learned delivering revolutionary R9 Nano and the upcoming R9 Fury X2 (codenamed Gemini).
    In terms of internal architecture, we’re dealing with a new beast. While Fiji was a refined Hawaii GPU, offering improvement efficiency of the old units and HBM memory, Greenland offers new micro-architecture, and should not be considered a member of GCN (Graphics Core Next) family by default. Unlike current lineup of GCN 1.0, 1.1, 1.2 chips, Arctic Islands is either ‘GCN 2.0’, or a new marketing name is on the way. After all, in 2016, GCN naming will be five years old, and feature ‘only’ three iterations (depending on do you consider Bonaire XT / Fiji XT the same brethren, or Fiji being named GCN 1.3).
    Development of HBM memory started in 2007, with AMD CPU and dGPU tests, continuing with Cypress HBM prototype… a fascinating journey. 2016 brings Greenland and HBM2 memory.

    In just a few months, the market will see AMD Greenland facing NVIDIA Pascal, which is also getting HBM2 memory. However, NVIDIA is not the only one, as Intel Knights Landing architecture arrives as a stand-alone Xeon Phi workstation product as well. Our sources repeatedly said that AMD learned a great deal in developing both HBM memory and GDDR5X (memory for more affordable graphics cards), and that their goal is to ‘knock the ball out of park’ when it comes to offering superior compute capabilities (AMD GPUs perform double-precision operations at half the clock, just like AMD and Intel x86 processors, unlike NVIDIA GPUs). We are not in liberty of disclosing the targeted raw performance of the part – as it is too early to say, given that ‘speed binning’ is not taking place yet. But even if the company hits significant thermal/yield issues, it should have no problem beating Intel’s Knights Landing by a factor of two. “Intel is perhaps the biggest ‘fraud’ in history of semiconductor industry,” one of our sources said. “They convinced the whole world they’re a logic company, while in fact they are a memory company that attaches logic to it.” Riposte was simple – ‘that attached logic is so good your founder copied it.’ Getting back on track, there is some truth to it. Seeing an architectural diagram of Knights Landing reveals very large L1 (2.3MB) and absolutely massive 36MB of L2 cache, which is bound to take a huge chunk of the die – with the logic once more being on the smaller side. Knights Landing is claimed to achieve 6 TFLOPS of Single Precision and 3 TFLOPS of Double Precision. AMD Fiji achieves 8.6 TFLOPS Single Precision, and locks the Double Precision to 1/16 rate – something which professional parts have unlocked. In case of unlocked Fiji, you would have 4.3 TFLOPS of double precision. With Greenland, AMD plans to offer professional products for the servers and workstations, with a completely new lineup. Then again, bear in mind that NVIDIA’s latest, Maxwell-based Tesla products also come with castrated DP performance, achieving less than one fourth of what Fiji can deliver today. Do bear in mind that AMD Greenland is intended to hook up to a new Server chip, codenamed Zeppelin. This is a multi-chip module (MCM) server (and hopefully workstation/high-end desktop) processor which will bring support for DDR4-3200 memory, targeting memory bandwidth exceeding 100GB/s, communicating with the Greenland GPU through a faster bus than what PCI Express can give, with its paltry 16GB/s bi-directional bandwidth. Is this a resurrection of Torrenza, a socketed, multi-chip HyperTransport initiative, remains to be seen. Is 2016 a landmark year for AMD / RTG? With a manufacturing advantage over NVIDIA (14nm vs 16nm), and compute advantage over both NVIDIA and Intel, it looks like the only thing preventing AMD from being a runaway success is AMD itself. We have had our fair share of bad experiences with the company, and loosing already won deals, walking away from business opportunities which ended earning millions to their competitors. If AMD (finally) acts smart, Fiji could be treated as an announcement, and Arctic Islands / Zen-based processing beasts for the world of Augmented and Virtual Reality, the company might have a shot of becoming very profitable in 2016 and 2017 – making their stock undervalued beyond belief. If they drop the ball (again), with misguided investments such as Mantle, they will have nobody to blame but themselves. For the sake of competition, we hope to see killer parts based on Zen and Arctic Island architectures.
    Noticia:
    http://vrworld.com/2015/11/19/14nm-a...ntel-xeon-phi/
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  6. #36
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
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    AMD Arctic Islands 400 Series Set To Launch In Summer of 2016 – Features 2X The Performance Per Watt, 14nm / 16nm FinFET And HBM2

    AMD’s next generation “Arctic Islands” family of Radeon 400 series is one that many gamers have been eagerly awaiting for so long, as it represents the first major generational leap in performance and efficiency since the introduction of the HD 7000 series in January of 2012. This is because it’s the very first generation of Radeon graphics chips to feature next generation FinFETs, rather than the aging 28nm process that spans everything from the 300 series, Fury series and Nvidia’s 900 series .

    The Arctic Islands family of GPUs has been subject to numerous leaks in the past, unfortunately none of which had any information about when they were actually going to be released. There hasn’t been any reliable information about Arctic Islands’ release timeframe, that is until today. We have confirmed that the company is planning to introduce its next generation 14nm / 16nm family of graphics cards throughout the summer of 2016 and into the back to school season. The launch is still too far out to make out any specific details and we have yet to confirm what the new series will actually be called, so we’re going to use “400 series” as placeholder until then.
    This goes hand-in-hand with what he had exclusively reported last month about AMD successfully completing the design of several “Arctic Islands” R 400 series GPUs which have been taped out and are on track to begin mass production. TSMC’s 16FF+ process is already in volume production at mature yields, with additional capacity and mass production expected by next year as both Nvidia and AMD ramp-up their next generation 16nm products. All in all the company expects to triple its 16nm capacity by the end of next year.
    AMD Radeon 400 Series Arctic Islands – Second Generation Stacked Memory “HBM2” & 2X The Performance Per Watt

    AMD’s President and CEO Lisa Su confirmed this past October the company’s plans to update the entire graphics line-up over “the coming quarters” with a new set of products that have “2X the performance per watt” of the current Radeon R9 Fury and 300 series of graphics cards.
    Lisa Su – Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. – President, CEO – Q3 2015 Earnings Teleconference
    I think it’s also fair to say that the graphics portfolio is quite broad, and so you will see us updating the entire portfolio over the coming quarters,
    Lisa Su – Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. – President, CEO – Q3 2015 Earnings Teleconference
    We are also focused on delivering our next-generation GPUs in 2016 designed to improve performance per watt by 2X compared to our current offerings, based on design architectural enhancements, as well as advanced FinFET process technology.

    Despite the existence of three+ different iterations of GCN, namely GCN 1.0 ( HD 7000 series ) , GCN 1.1 ( R9 290 series) , GCN 1.2 ( R9 285 and 380) and Fiji ( R9 Fury X, R9 Fury and R9 Nano) which is based on an updated GCN 1.2 design; according to AMD’s Chief Technology Officer Mark Papermaster AMD only recognizes having introduced two main generations of GCN so far. With the next major iteration to come out next year in the form of the “Arctic Islands” family of graphics chips.
    Arctic Islands will feature three major improvements over AMD’s current current R 300 series and Fury series line-up. These include second generation HBM, next generation “Arctic Islands” GCN architecture as well as a more advanced 14/16nm FinFET manufacturing process. The three of which mean that for the first time since 2012 we’re going to get a truly next generation family of GPUs, with performance and power efficiency levels that vastly exceed what we see today from the 28nm 300 series and Fury series.
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    At 1 Terabyte/s of memory bandwidth HBM 2.0 offers double the bandwidth of HBM 1.0 found in the R9 Fury X which features a 4096bit memory interface, 4GB of VRAM and a total of 512GB/s of bandwidth. The flagship GPU in the Arctic Islands family has been numerously purported as “Greenland“. Which is set to be AMD’s most powerful and most advanced graphics chip to date. Greenland is rumored to feature up to 18 billion transistors and 32GB of second generation HBM with 1TB/s of memory bandwidth. Making it the largest ever graphics engine conceived by the company, at approximately twice the transistor count of AMD’s current flagship code named “Fiji” powering the Fury series of Radeon graphics cards.


    The Arctic Islands graphics architecture will power everything from next generation mobile and desktop GPUs to APUs and semi-custom chips. There’s also strong evidence to suggest that Nindendo’s next generation gaming device “Nintendo NX” – which is coming next year – will be powered by an AMD semi-custom SOC. Making it a very likely candidate to feature AMD’s 3rd generation “Arctic Islands” GCN architecture.
    AMD Radeon 400 Series Arctic Islands To Feature 14nm / 16nm FinFET Process

    AMD’s chief technology officer, Mark Papermaster, announced last month that AMD will in fact be leveraging Globalfoundries’ 14LPP process for CPU, APU and GPU products. Which was a very interesting development to say the least as It was confirmed back in August that AMD is also in fact one of TSMC’s clients for the 16nm node. The very same process that Nvidia had officially confirmed earlier in the year that it will be using for its next generation Pascal GPUs in 2016.

    Mark Papermaster, senior vice president and chief technology officer at AMD :
    FinFET technology is expected to play a critical foundational role across multiple AMD product lines, starting in 2016, GLOBALFOUNDRIES has worked tirelessly to reach this key milestone on its 14LPP process. We look forward to GLOBALFOUNDRIES’ continued progress towards full production readiness and expect to leverage the advanced 14LPP process technology across a broad set of our CPU, APU, and GPU products. – Press Release
    From a historical point view, every one of AMD’s graphics product launches on a next generation manufacturing process in the current and past two decades was delivered on a TSMC process node. Now that we have official confirmation that AMD will be building FinFET GPUs at both TSMC and Globalfoundries next year it’s going to be a fascinating spectacle to see which GPUs would debut on which process and why AMD decided to go against its tradition and partner with both foundries for its next generation Arctic Islands GPUs.
    14LPE is the early access “low power” version of the common Samsung/Globalfoudnries 14nm FinFET process, while 14LPP is the second generation, high performance variant that is set to succeed 14LPE. Despite its name, 14LPP should deliver better performance as well as lower power consumption, the only caveat being its later availability.

    14nm FinFET will offer GPU design engineers nearly double transistors to play with in the same area as the current 28nm process. 14nm FinFET also has significantly faster switching speeds, which will translate to significantly higher clock speeds compared to current 28nm based GPUs. This is all in addition to the drastic power savings enabled by the smaller feature sizes and the move from planar to FinFET gates.
    14nm FinFET Technology

    Globalfoundries.com
    14LPE – Early time-to-market version with area and power benefits for mobility applications

    14LPP – Enhanced version with higher performance and lower power; a full platform offering with MPW, IP enablement and wide application coverage
    TSMC’s 16nm FinFET process node offers equally impressive figures with double the transistor density of current 28nm technology as well as faster switching speeds and finally significantly lower power consumption.
    TSMC.com
    TSMC’s 16FF+ (FinFET Plus) technology can provide above 65 percent higher speed, around 2 times the density, or 70 percent less power than its 28HPM technology. Comparing with 20SoC technology, 16FF+ provides extra 40% higher speed and 60% power saving. By leveraging the experience of 20SoC technology, TSMC 16FF+ shares the same metal backend process in order to quickly improve yield and demonstrate process maturity for time-to-market value.
    It will be interesting to see how things play out next year with Nvidia’s Pascal GPUs which will also be produced on TSMC’s 16nm FinFET process and feature second generation High Bandwidth Memory. How much exactly Pascal and Arctic Islands GPUs are going to cost will depend almost entirely on the production yields and volumes of the leading edge FinFET node next year. But so far this is shaping up to be one of the biggest performance and power efficiency boosts we’re going to see from a new generation of graphics cards in a long while.


    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  7. #37
    Master Business & GPU Man Avatar de Enzo
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    Tou para ver o que é que vem para ai...
    Devido à falta de espaço na assinatura, resolvi colocar em "Acerca de mim" os meus projectos]
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/member.php?u=801

  8. #38
    O Administrador Avatar de LPC
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    Boas!
    Era o que eu tinha já dito...

    Nvidia lança para ai em Fevereiro e Março e a AMD lança-as em Julho/Agosto...

    Vai ser muito pouca a diferença, mas ainda assim a suficiente, para os fazer correr atrás do prejuizo...
    Deveria ser ao contrário o lançamento... AMD primeiro que a Nvidia...

    Mas pronto... é o que é ... vamos a ver se compensa em performance...

    Cumprimentos,

    LPC

    My Specs:
    Case: Phanteks Eclipse P400S - CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 - 2700X @ XFR2 Ghz - Board: Gigabyte AORUS X470 Ultra Gaming - RAM: 16GB DDR4 G.Skill RipJaws V 3200Mhz CAS 14-14-14-34 (2x8GB) - GPU: PALIT Nvidia GTX 1080 Super JetStream 8 GB
    Cooling: Arctic Cooling 3x F14 Silent - CPU Cooler: Arctic Cooling: Liquid Freezer 360 (6xF12 Fans) - Storage: Samsung SSD 840 EVO 1 TB - PSU: EVGA G3 750W - Monitor: ACER XB270HU 1440p @ 144hz G-Sync

  9. #39
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
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    AMD GPUs In 2016: HDR, FreeSync Over HDMI And New Standards

    AMD launched its Fiji GPU—the company’s newest design—about six months ago. It fared well, besting Nvidia’s GeForce GTX 980 Ti gaming card at 3840x2160 across our benchmark suite. But AMD’s management knows that there’s still a lot of work to do. Most of the Radeon lineup is based on much older silicon, and although those GPUs remain competitive through strategically timed price cuts, they’re also showing their age. For instance, Nvidia’s second-gen Maxwell processors dating back over a year support HDMI 2.0, whereas all of the 300-series Radeons are limited to HDMI 1.4.
    That’s going to change in 2016. Over the next few months, AMD plans to divulge more details about its next-generation architecture, including improvements made to the graphics processing, fixed-function media blocks, memory subsystem and compute capabilities. For now, though, the emphasis is on a beefier display controller and what it enables. Not only will the next-gen GPU incorporate HDMI 2.0a, but it’ll also get DisplayPort 1.3.
    New Standards

    HDMI 2.0 increases the interface’s maximum pixel clock to 600 MHz (from 340 MHz in version 1.4), pushing peak throughput to 18 Gb/s (from 10.2 Gb/s). That’s enough bandwidth to facilitate 4096x2160 at 60 Hz. HDMI 2.0a builds on the 2.0 specification by adding support for HDR formats. You can expect HDR to be a big bullet point in the company’s next-generation GPUs as a result of its augmented display controller.
    As mentioned, Nvidia’s Maxwell-based GPUs support HDMI 2.0; they cannot be retrofitted to support 2.0a. Additionally, only certain models include HDCP 2.2 support for playback of protected 4K content. Although none of AMD’s current processors incorporate HDCP 2.2, its next-gen GPUs will.

    The DisplayPort 1.3 specification is even more aggressive than HDMI. Its High Bit Rate 3 mode pushes up to 8.1 Gb/s per lane, or a total of 32.4 Gb/s. With that much available bandwidth, the output options start looking pretty wild. How does 5120x2880 at 60 Hz sound? Or 4K on a 120 Hz panel? Those aren’t hypotheticals; AMD expects single-cable 5K screens by mid-2016, and 2160p120 displays supporting dynamic refresh rates (FreeSync) by the end of next year.
    Doubling Down On FreeSync

    Although it took longer for the FreeSync ecosystem to coalesce around AMD’s vision, the technology is certainly building momentum.
    The addition of low-framerate compensation in its Radeon Software Crimson Edition driver should ameliorate the tearing/judder issues previously experienced on FreeSync-capable systems that dropped below the display’s minimum dynamic refresh rate. In short, the feature employs an algorithm that monitors application performance. Should the output fall below the variable refresh floor, frames are inserted to maintain smoothness (with V-sync on) and reduce tearing (with V-sync off). LFC is automatically enabled on existing FreeSync-capable displays with maximum refresh rates greater than 2.5x their minimum.

    The corner case where performance drops too low didn’t affect our FreeSync Vs. G-Sync event, because the Asus MG279Qs we used had a 35 Hz minimum that was never breached. Rather, the issue identified by several of our readers was the panel’s 90 Hz VRR ceiling, above which they experienced tearing with V-sync turned off. Even this should become less of an issue moving forward, though; Nixeus recently launched its NX-VUE24, a 1920x1080 monitor with a 30 Hz to 144 Hz variable refresh range. We haven’t tested it yet, and the 24” TN-based panel doesn’t sound like our ideal solution. But by bringing it up, AMD clearly knows it needs to push for VRRs that match G-Sync’s capabilities.
    As it looks to expand refresh ranges, AMD is also trying to make FreeSync more accessible by enabling the technology over HDMI. According to David Glen, senior fellow in the RTG’s display technologies group, scaler vendors MStar, Novatek and Realtek are already onboard. How is AMD accomplishing this when HDMI does not support variable refresh? “The HDMI specification permits something called vendor-specific extensions,” Glen stated. “They are fully compliant with the HDMI standard. We’ve used this aspect of HDMI to enable FreeSync over (the interface)… If at some future time the HDMI spec allows variable refresh rate, our graphics products, we fully expect, will be able to support both the HDMI standard method and the method we’re introducing now.”
    Compatible monitors are expected to share the graphics hardware’s flexibility. Acer, LG and Samsung are already announcing a combined eight models supporting FreeSync over HDMI, ranging from 1920x1080 to 3440x1440. Although we don’t have specifics on the panel types being used, AMD’s David Glen told us to expect availability starting in Q1 2016.

    The bad news, of course, is that existing FreeSync-capable displays with HDMI ports probably won’t acquire this functionality. Although it doesn’t sound like there’s anything preventing firmware updates with the vendor-specific extensions, AMD’s Glen suggests that it’s more likely we’d see current models revised to include the feature.
    On the GPU side, FreeSync over HDMI will work on any Radeon card capable of variable refresh over DisplayPort, including the full lineup of GCN 1.1- and 1.2-based processors. Tahiti, Pitcairn, Cape Verde and their rebranded derivatives aren’t compatible.
    High Dynamic Range Is A Go

    The consumer electronics industry is in the throes of embracing high dynamic range as “the next big thing” for reproducing more lifelike images, and AMD wants everyone to know that it’s onboard as well.
    Getting there is going to take a lot of effort. Content needs to be mastered, distributed and displayed differently than what we’re accustomed to. This time next year, we’ll hopefully see LCD-based screens able to hit 2000 nits of luminance—a big improvement over the 471 cd/m² attained by the brightest UHD monitor we’ve reviewed thus far. But even that’s a far cry from the BT.2020 color space.
    The black dotted line represents sRGB; we want to get to the blue dotted line.
    Still, Kim Meinerth, senior fellow and system architect, assured us that AMD put significant effort into building a display pipeline that supports the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers’ 10-bit ST 2084 electro-optical transfer function, which is much better at mimicking human vision than today’s BT.1886 curve.

    Existing Radeon R9 300-series cards can be made to support HDR gaming and photos with 10 bits per channel at 1080p120, 1440p60 and 2160p30. Playing back HDR content at 2160p60 is going to require HDMI 2.0a or DisplayPort 1.3, though, and for that you’ll need to wait for AMD’s next-gen GPUs. Not that we’re holding our breath—Meinerth expects the bring-up for mass market HDR-capable displays in the second half of 2016.
    HDR on AMD's graphics cards in 2016
    For what it’s worth, Nvidia’s GM2xx processors can also be made to support HDR gaming and photos at 10 bits per component, though it remains to be seen how the company sets itself up against AMD in 2016.
    Noticia:
    http://www.tomshardware.com/news/amd...hdr,30711.html


    Esperemos que além destas inovações, as graficas cheguem em condições e sem problemas como os que se viram nas Fury X, Fury e Nano aos consumidores.
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  10. #40
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
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    GDDR5, GDDR6 rule 2016 GPUs



    Exclusive: Highest end are HBM 2.0, GDDR6
    AMD over-hyped the new High Bandwidth Memory standard and now the second generation HBM 2.0 is coming in 2016. However it looks like most of GPUs shipped in this year will still rely on the older GDDR5.

    Most of the entry level, mainstream and even performance graphics cards from both Nvidia and AMD will rely on the GDDR5. This memory has been with us since 2007 but it has dramatically increased in speed. The memory chip has shrunken from 60nm in 2007 to 20nm in 2015 making higher clocks and lower voltage possible.
    Some of the big boys, including Samsung and Micron, have started producing 8 Gb GDDR5 chips that will enable cards with 1GB memory per chip. The GTX 980 TI has 12 chips with 4 Gb support (512MB per chip) while Radeon Fury X comes with four HMB 1.0 chips supporting 1GB per chip at much higher bandwidth. Geforce Titan X has 24 chips with 512MB each, making the total amount of memory to 12GB.
    The next generation cards will get 12GB memory with 12 GDDR5 memory chips or 24GB with 24 chips. Most of the mainstream and performance cards will come with much less memory.
    Only a few high end cards such as Greenland high end FinFET solution from AMD and a Geforce version of Pascal will come with the more expensive and much faster HMB 2.0 memory.
    GDDR6 is arriving in 2016 at least at Micron and the company promises a much higher bandwidth compared to the GDDR5. So there will be a few choices.
    Noticia:
    http://www.fudzilla.com/news/graphic...re-gddr5-gddr6


    Já se tinha falado sopbre um novo formato de memória, o GDDR 5X... afinal parece que vai continuar ainda a utilizar o GDDR 5, o que a meu ver faz mais sentido dado que permite praticar preços mais baixos.
    Infelizmente para nós, HBM 2.0, vai ser só para os topos de gama, o que torna isso praticamente num mercado de nicho.
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  11. #41
    Master Business & GPU Man Avatar de Enzo
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    Vão explorar o hbm2 até a gddr6 ser mais acessivel para producao. 8 anos a levar com gddr5, já é um bocado de tempo não?
    Devido à falta de espaço na assinatura, resolvi colocar em "Acerca de mim" os meus projectos]
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/member.php?u=801

  12. #42
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
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    Não é muito tendo em conta que ainda se vai continuar a levar com ele nas proximas gerações, não me parece que nas proximas duas gerações de placas graficas o HBM se torne realidade para mercado sub 250 ou 200€

    Olhando ainda para o anterior padrao GDDR3, o GDDR5 já vai em quase o dobro de tempo que está a ser utilizado nas placas gráficas.
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  13. #43
    Master Business & GPU Man Avatar de Enzo
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    As primeiras gddr6 que sairem, tambem não devem de ser para esse mercado.
    Devido à falta de espaço na assinatura, resolvi colocar em "Acerca de mim" os meus projectos]
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/member.php?u=801

  14. #44
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
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    Até pode ser, basta que imitem a GDDR5
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  15. #45
    Master Business & GPU Man Avatar de Enzo
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    Duas tecnologias concorrentes, na mesma altura...pode ser que seja bom.
    Devido à falta de espaço na assinatura, resolvi colocar em "Acerca de mim" os meus projectos]
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/member.php?u=801

 

 
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