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  1. #1
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
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    Novidades Tecnologicas - Cameras/Sensores

    Canon develops 250-megapixel APS-H sensor

    Canon has announced the development of a new APS-H sized CMOS imaging sensor that incorporates approximately 250 million pixels. It claims this is a world record for a sensor under the 35mm full-frame size. Maximum native resolution captured images have the dimensions of 19,580 x 12,600 pixels.

    While sometimes an increase in pixel count can result in signal delays, the new Canon sensor doesn't suffer from such problems with its ultra-high signal readout speed of 1.25 billion pixels per second. The Japanese imaging tech firm explains that it has boosted the readout speed using "circuit miniaturization and enhanced signal-processing technology". Thus it is capable to recording these huge 250-megapixel images at up to five frames per second. Canon insists that, despite the massive pixel count, its architecture delivers high sensitivity and low-noise.
    The sensor is a pretty good video performer too. Presumably decreasing the frame size, to achieve something smoother than the 5fps achievable at the full 250-megapixel capture, Canon claims that the sensor is capable of video of 125x FHD resolution or 30x 4K resolution. Thanks to the lashings of extra pixels, data video editors, mixing down to something like 4K, could crop and magnify video scenes without loss of detail and clarity.

    Extraordinarily Canon says that the sensor was tested in a camera that could "capture images enabling the distinguishing of lettering on the side of an airplane flying at a distance of approximately 18km from the shooting location". However the optical zoom of the camera lens employed helped it out, according to a little asterisk.
    Canon expects the new sensor to be used in surveillance and crime prevention tools, ultra-high-resolution measuring instruments and other industrial equipment. So it sounds like this particular sensor won't be on its way to a compact camera or smartphone.
    Noticia:
    http://hexus.net/ce/news/cameras/862...-aps-h-sensor/
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  2. #2
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
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    The Science Of Camera Sensors

    If you want a ridiculously in-depth explanation of how cameras capture images, this should do it for you.



    Noticia:
    http://www.hardocp.com/news/2015/12/...s#.VmWX5r9v708
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  3. #3
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
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    Kodak Relaunches the Super 8 Camera


    Kodak has delighted film lovers by announcing the relaunch of the fabled Super 8 film camera. Super 8, named for its 8mm single perforation film stock, was the entry-level format that inspired generations of film directors, ranging from old legends like Steven Spielberg, to (relatively) young upstarts Christopher Nolan, director of Inception and the Dark Knight trilogy, and the man behind the recent Star Wars revival, JJ Abrams. Jeff Clarke, the CEO of Eastman Kodak, described Super 8, which celebrated its 50th anniversary this year, as “an ecosystem for film.”

    “The news that Kodak is enabling the next generation of filmmakers with access to an upgraded and enhanced version of the same analog technology that first made me fall in love with cinematic storytelling is unbelievably exciting,” Christopher Nolan said.
    “For me, 8mm was the beginning of everything,” Steven Spielberg added. “When I think of 8mm, I think of the movies.”
    “While any technology that allows for visual storytelling must be embraced, nothing beats film,” said JJ Abrams. “The fact that Kodak is building a brand new Super 8 camera is a dream come true. With a gorgeous new design, interchangeable lenses and a brilliant scheme for development and delivery of footage, this camera appears to be the perfect bridge between the efficiency of the digital world and the warmth and quality of analog.”

    The new Super 8 cameras and film stock are expected to hit the market at some point this year, with the hardware priced between $400 and $750.




    Noticia:
    http://www.eteknix.com/kodak-relaunc...uper-8-camera/
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  4. #4
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
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    Photoshopped Image Wins Nikon Photography Contest With Hilarious Results




    On Thursday, Nikon Singapore announced a winner of their NikonCaptures photography contest, Chay Yu Wei, whose winning entry was a shot of an aeroplane perfectly captured by a ladder in Chinatown. Or so they thought. As many photographers were quick to point out, Yu Wei’s image was quite clearly edited.
    “Yu Wei chanced upon a set of ladders while on a photowalk with his friends in Chinatown, and thought the view above would make an interesting perspective,” Nikon’s post read. “Little did he expect to catch an airplane in mid-air. We’ll try looking up too, Yu Wei.” The winning entry, supposedly capured using a Nikon D90 at f/2.8 and 1/1600s won Chay Yu Wei a Nikon-branded trolley bag. Nikon have stood by the decision, posting a comment on Facebook, apologising for the oversight and planning to revise the rules following this, also stating “NikonCaptures is a casual photography contest that focuses not on the devices or props you use, but on the imagination and creativity that each photographer exudes while capturing and sharing their images.”
    Inspection of the winning entry reveals a white box around the aeroplane in the image, easily visible without the use of any tools, although it was pointed out that adjusting the levels on the photograph causes it to obviously stand out. The internet was quick to their image editors after seeing this, posting a barrage of amusing takes on the image, including replacing the aeroplane with a TIE Fighter, the Death Star, Godzilla and many, some paired with comedic takes on Nikon’s original announcement.
    He should have waited longer for the coaster to add a bit of drama. – Render Brant

    I chanced upon a set of ladders while browsing the internet with my imaginary 501 legion and thought the “award winning” view would make an interesting perspective. Little did I expect to catch the Death Star from space. – Rogan Yeoh

    Such a poor copy and paste by Yu Wei can win a Nikon trolley bag, my entry can win the new Nikon D5 with AF-S 400mm f/2.8E FL ED VR. LOL !!! – Glenn Guan

    Meanwhile, others took to point out the flaws in Yu Wei’s photoshopping of his photograph, explaining that use of the ‘multiply’ layer blending would have hidden the white box surrounding the plane. Yu Wei even responded to comments on Instagram regarding the photograph as if it were real after the photoshop ruse was already discovered. While it seems clear that Nikon has no intention of pulling the photograph or the contest as a result despite the hilarious and mocking responses it caused, it has definitely given Nikon more publicity and provideda entertainment for many.


    Noticia:
    http://www.eteknix.com/photoshopped-...rious-results/


    Lol... premios a fotomontagens!!!!
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  5. #5
    Master Business & GPU Man Avatar de Enzo
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    Essa montagem merecia um prémio
    Devido à falta de espaço na assinatura, resolvi colocar em "Acerca de mim" os meus projectos]
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/member.php?u=801

  6. #6
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
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    Shootout redux: Smartphone camera vs tricked-out DSLR, one year later

    "The best camera," goes the old saying, "is the one you have with you." It’s true, too—spend just a few minutes browsing places like /r/pics and you’ll find stunning image after stunning image taken on a wide variety of cameras, from DSLRs with telephoto lenses all the way down to smartphones. A modern smartphone is equipped with a hell of a lot of picture-taking power and can spit out pro-looking images without a whole lot of effort, and nearly everyone has one on them all the time. Does that mean, then, that the best camera today is a smartphone?

    We explored this in our October 2014 "iPhone vs. DSLR" shootout—and we learned a lot. The first lesson was, at least according to a whole lot of people, that I suck at photography. And that’s all right—I do suck at photography. Most of the images I take are properly called "product photography," done inside in studio conditions with lots of lights and not necessarily a lot of variation in settings. Shooting in the real world is a lot more complicated.
    More importantly, we proved conventional wisdom right. A smartphone does take awesome pictures, so you don’t need a DSLR, two bags of gear, and a tripod unless you really need an expensive DSLR, two bags of gear, and a tripod.
    But—there’s always a but!—when used properly, especially under anything less than ideal outdoor lighting conditions, that expensive DSLR with its thousands of dollars’ worth of lenses and off-camera flashes can produce wondrous results. Do some post-processing in an application like Lightroom or DxO and you can get some stunning images that would be nearly impossible to pull out of a smartphone. Sometimes, at least.
    Round two: Fight!

    About 15 months have passed since the initial shootout, and I’ve tried to spend that time brushing up on my photography. I’ve dragged my Canon 5D Mark III around on every trip I’ve taken in the past year, shooting close to 20,000 pictures (some of which even came out well). I can’t guarantee I’ve gotten any better at photography in general, but I’ve certainly gotten a lot more experienced. My subjective evaluation of my picture-taking skill is still all over the map, but I like to think I’ve climbed a bit since last time.
    Enlarge / Another lesson: You tend to think you're better at photography than you actually are.

    Coupled with the release of a new iPhone—equipped with what by all accounts is a pretty darn good smartphone camera—we decided the time was right to revisit the smartphone vs. DSLR question at Ars. And this time around, we set out to use a much broader variety of locations. For the smartphone side, I’m using my personal device, an iPhone 6S Plus. This is a current-generation iPhone with about as sophisticated a camera as you’re likely to find on a smartphone (though our Microsoft master Peter Bright preferred the camera on the Lumia 950 he recently reviewed). The iPhone has a 12-megapixel rear camera with an f/2.2 aperture (some sites quote it as f/2.0, but EXIF data from the phone's pictures says f/2.2), an 8.47mm sensor with tiny 1.2μm pixels specifically designed to cut down on crosstalk, and optical image stabilization. It’s also backed by sophisticated software that does its best to produce viewable, well-exposed images under any circumstances (without a third-party camera app, specific exposure settings like aperture and shutter speed are not modifiable, so with an iPhone you’re always shooting on auto).
    Enlarge / Apple's current generation of smartphone cameras all have bumps. For this piece, we used an iPhone 6S Plus (bottom, in gray) for our smartphone camera.
    Andrew Cunningham

    On the DSLR side, we’re still shooting on the same Canon 5D Mark III body we used last year. It has a 22-megapixel sensor that measures 35mm diagonally, the same size as a frame of 35mm film (hence why the camera is referred to as a "full frame" DSLR). For lenses, we’ve upped our game a bit this year, relying on five different pieces of Canon glass—three zoom lenses and two primes:

    • Canon EF24-70mm f/2.8L II USM (rented)
    • Canon EF24-105mm f/4L IS USM (owned)
    • Canon EF70-200mm f/2.8L USM (owned)
    • Canon EF35 f/1.4L USM (rented)
    • Canon EF50 f/1.8 II (owned)

    All told, that’s about $5,200 worth of lenses. The 24-70mm and the 35mm prime are both extremely high quality, which is why I rented them (though only a couple of images taken with the 24-70mm ended up in this shootout—I used it extensively for taking pictures of jets and moon rocks). The 24-105mm and the 70-200mm are solid workhorse lenses that you’d find in most Canon shooters’ kits, and the little "nifty fifty" 50mm f/1.8 is pretty crazily affordable for the image quality it yields (I use it mostly for product shots).
    Enlarge / This is one of the lenses I rented to use for this shootout (though I ended up using it a lot more for other stories). This single lens by itself costs more than double the price of my unlocked 64GB iPhone 6S Plus.

    The DSLR body itself costs $2,500; add to that the cost of the 600EX-RT and 430EX II flashes I used for some of the images and the tripod I used for a few others (not to mention the bag to haul the whole mess around in), and you’ve got damn near $9,000 dollars' worth of equipment.
    All this kind of makes that 64GB $849 iPhone 6S Plus look like a crazy bargain—and one that can do things the DSLR can’t, like shoot 4K video. At 10 times the cost, does a bag stuffed with lenses, flashes, and a DSLR really provide 10 times the image quality of a smartphone?
    Maybe—or maybe not. As with all things, the devil is in the details.
    How we tested

    We took our iPhone and our DSLR bag to several different indoor and outdoor locations and shot hundreds of images with each. Rather than try to manually match settings on both devices like we did last time, this time around we relied on the iPhone’s built-in camera app to do its thing and produce whatever it thought was the best image of whatever we were pointing it at.
    Conversely for the DSLR, we shot in a mixture of Manual and Program mode, capturing only full-size RAW files. The RAWs were then subjected to a full post-processing workflow in both Adobe Lightroom and DxO Optics Pro—this included exposure compensation, tone adjustment, color tweaking, white balance adjustment, and everything else one might normally do to a RAW frame (including DxO’s Prime noise removal, which, as near as I can tell, is basically witchcraft).
    The only thing I didn’t adjust—much—was the framing of both images. Instead, I tried when shooting to make both the iPhone’s and the DSLR’s compositions match each other as closely as possible. In some instances, this meant digitally zooming the iPhone 6’s camera so that the frame contained what I wanted. As you’ll see, these digitally zoomed images, without exception, look like garbage. Anyone who has fiddled with photographs on a smartphone should already know this, but it bears repeating: don’t use your phone’s digital zoom. It’s terrible, and it will make your pictures look terrible.














    Ver toda a review:
    http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2016/...ne-year-later/
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  7. #7
    Master Business & GPU Man Avatar de Enzo
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    É obvio e claro que a DSLR ganha, até com tudo automatico, mas essas fotos com o iphone estão com qualidade péssima.
    Devido à falta de espaço na assinatura, resolvi colocar em "Acerca de mim" os meus projectos]
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/member.php?u=801

  8. #8
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
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    Canon's new 1D X Mark II shoots 4K 60FPS video, costs $5999


    Canon has just come out and announced its new flagship camera, the EOS-1DX Mark II, which is the company's answer to Nikon's new D5 camera. Canon is aiming its new snapper at professional sports photographers and photojournalists that require a fast-shooting body that's made for demanding conditions.


    The new Canon 1D X Mark II features a full-frame 20.2-megapixel sensor, that can shoot up to 14FPS with autofocus and 16FPS without. It features a native ISO range of 100-51,200 with expanded sensitivity of up to 409,600, and it can capture the magical 4K 60FPS. It sports a sharper 1.62 million-dot 3.2-inch screen, a new autofocus system with 61 points (41 cross-type) and a built-in GPS. Not too bad at all, Canon.


    Canon will be selling its new 1D X Mark II in April for $5999 for the body-only, with Canon selling a bundle with a 64GB CFast card and reader for $6299. There's also a new Wi-Fi adapter, something Canon will be selling separately, for $600.

    Noticia:
    http://www.tweaktown.com/news/50106/...999/index.html
    Última edição de Jorge-Vieira : 02-02-16 às 17:48
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  9. #9
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
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    First footage from 8K RED WEAPON Vista Vision camera shows up


    Full-frame, 8192x4320p, up to 75fps with 70mm lenses

    At the end of January 2016, the first RED WEAPON 6K Magnesium cameras began shipping to professional videographers worldwide, a few months after the first RED 6K Woven Carbon Fiber and Forged Carbon Fiber hit the streets. The Irvine, California-based company then released its flagship RED WEAPON 8K Vista Vision camera at the end of 2015. Now, we have some of the first original footage from its 8K 35mm flagship at the smoothness of full-frame, ultra-high 32-megapixel resolution.

    The RED WEAPON 8K Vista Vision camera, originally announced at NAB 2015 in Las Vegas last April, is capable of shooting 8K (8192x4320p) resolution at 60fps in full-sensor mode, or up to 75fps in a scope (2.40:1) frame format.
    Michael Cioni, a filmmaker and supervisor known for his work in The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2011), The Amazing Spider-Man (2012) and Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides (2011), has said that arming filmmakers with 8K cameras is a great way to avoid upscaling if the final intended resolution is 4K. For example, if a filmmaker wants to reframe or video effects needs more resolution, then shooting only at 4K means finishing below 4K. The result is that the film must then be upscaled into a 4K finish.
    “What I encourage everyone to consider is that 8K is not the new 4K. Instead, 8K is about to open up an entirely new era of cameras which I now call "The Super Sensors.” Super Sensors are camera systems like Alexa65 or Weapon 8K that are capturing with so much resolution that (like a DSLR) they are able to create a new level of smoothness that makes things look more like a photograph and less like a digital representation of film.”
    “This is the camera exercise I did with the help of my friend, Erin Gales. Everything was shot with the Weapon 8K at 1280 ISO except for a 2nd camera angle during interviews, which was a Dragon 6K. Special thanks to Phil Newman, Megan Swanson, and Keenan Mock for their help on set.”



    The original 8K (8192x4320p) video is uploaded in 4K Ultra HD 3840x2160p resolution and retains quite a bit of quality from the original 4K master. The file weighs in at 1.281GB and can be downloaded here.
    In January, RED also announced that Guardians of the Galaxy 2, produced by Marvel Studios, will be the first major feature film shot on their new 8K WEAPON Vista Vision full-frame 35mm camera. The movie began filming this month at Pinewood Atlanta Studios in Fayette County, Georgia and is scheduled to be released May 5, 2017 in the United States.
    Guardians of the Galaxy 2 director James Gunn has explained his decision about choosing the 8K WEAPON camera, citing the need to have more control over every pixel of the film and the easier ability to seamlessly incorporate more visual and digital effects at a higher resolution:
    “Firstly, I believe when shooting on a format like the Red Weapon 8K or the Alexa 65, the amount of data is so massive - certainly more so than on a strip of film - that it gives you more freedom in production and post production to create exactly the film you want to create than actual film does. As anyone who has ever worked with me knows, I am a control freak. Such high resolution gives me the ability to control every single bit of data (to do so would take a long time, but at least the knowledge comforts me).”
    Back in November 2015, RED President Jarred Land and his team at Global Dynamics United launched a rehoused, bulletproof Canon 24mm f/2.8 lens and put it on a RED EPIC DRAGON camera for video demonstration purposes. The team then shot a clip of the camera being blasted with water and fire. The video was shot in 8K (8192x4320p) at 72fps on the RED WEAPON Vista Vision camera and is dubbed “Catastrophic Environmental Test 1.”





    The RED Dragon 8K Vista Vision sensor itself is a $20k upgrade over the regular 6K Weapon Dragon and was expected to begin shipping at the end of 2015. The bare camera, or 6K Weapon Woven CF “brain,” is $49,955, making the entire purchase of a RED 8K camera close to $70k.

    The only other Full Ultra High Definition (FUHD) 8K videos we have seen on the Internet so far come from YouTube and Vimeo, but very few of them are able to be downloaded in their native 8K resolution format. Here is one that we discovered of an 8K timelapse of Machu Picchu, Peru, filmed by Philip Bloom.

    The original 8K (8192x4320p) video is uploaded to Vimeo in its native resolution. The file weighs in at 2.091GB and can be downloaded here.

    Noticia:
    http://www.fudzilla.com/news/39941-f...amera-shows-up
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  10. #10
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
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    Sony Exmor IMX318 Announced: Could We See It In Samsung’s And Apple’s Flagship Devices

    Sony will be announcing its upcoming flagship sensor named Exmor IMX318, and it will be present in next generation smartphones. Can you guess the number of megapixels present inside the sensor?

    Sony IMX318 Will Pack 22.5 Megapixels And We Could See This Inside Galaxy Note 6 Or Even The Latest iPhone 7

    As smartphones tend to get thinner, manufactures are forced to bring more and more sacrifices as far the hardware of its mobile devices are concerned. Sony isn’t about to compromise the image capturing quality of mobile devices, irrespective of how thin they get which is why the company will be announcing its latest sensor. IMX318 is a type 1/2.6 stacked CMOS image sensor with 22.5 megapixels, and it boasts a more compact size, greater image quality, and higher performance. For those of you that do not know, Sony claims that new Exmor RS is the industry’s first one to be equipped with built-in high-speed hybrid autofocus (AF), as fast as 0.03 seconds and built-in 3-axis electronic image stabilization technology for video.

    The Japanese firm will be attempting to begin shipments for this new CMOS image sensor during May, 2016, which is a huge time frame from when devices like Galaxy Note 6 and iPhone 7 will be officially announced. Galaxy Note 6 is expected to be announced during the month of September and its greatest rival in the smartphone industry will also be showcased during the same month.





    Coming back to the new sensor, it will not only boast enhanced resolution, but will also match its predecessor in image quality despite the IMX318’s smaller size and unit pixels. The only issue that we are thinking about right now is that since the sensor will be smaller in size, and there are too many megapixels crammed in it, the sensor might not be able to perform as well in low-light conditions. This is because less light will enter per pixel as the megapixel count increases, and with the sensor already smaller than its predecessors, we suspect that it will perform terribly in low light environments.
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    However, Sony has stated that image quality will not decrease, as there is a sample given below showing different image results on different sensors. As for the 3-axis electronic image stabilization feature for video recording purposes, the firm has stated that the sensor leverages the image stabilization technology that Sony has cultivated over its years developing cameras, and stabilizes video recording even with sufficient camera shake.

    No drop in image quality from the IMX230 predecessor model (Left: 1.12μm unit pixel size) to the IMX318 (Right: 1.0μm unit pixel size), despite the latter’s smaller size

    Moreover, less power will be used than when it is accomplished by software processing in the external application processor. Since it enables smooth video shooting, this image sensor is suited for incorporation into not only smartphones, but also a variety of other products that tend to generate substantial camera shake, such as aerial drones used for image capturing.
    Watch all the videos, tell us what you think and if you want to get to know the complete specifications of the sensor, then they have been given below.

    Source


    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  11. #11
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
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    Lens-Less Cameras Are Now A Thing


    Cameras have evolved so much over the past few years. They began with the throwaway cameras you would take on field trips with you to capture 40 different moments, then they became digital with you buying a small block of metal and watching the screen light up as the lens zoomed out the body to focus. Now you don’t even use need to buy a camera, they are built-in every smartphone and even pens and watches. The traditional drawback to these devices is the lenses that are used to focus on an image, but no more.
    A professor of computer and electrical engineering at Rice University in Texas, Richard Baraniuk, believes that lenses are the only thing holding back cameras. To combat this, his team has developed a design based on a pinhole camera. The difficulty of pinhole cameras is they don’t allow for a lot of light, the solution to this problem appeared to be quite simple. Don’t use just one pinhole camera, use thousands.
    The problem with a thousand different cameras, is a thousand different images are hard to use. So with a little modern logic, it’s not possible to produce a camera that is not only without a traditional lens but also slim and almost hidden.



    Noticia:
    http://www.eteknix.com/lens-less-cameras-now-thing/
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  12. #12
    Master Business & GPU Man Avatar de Enzo
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    Acabou-se as lentes com fungos, humidades e o raio!
    Devido à falta de espaço na assinatura, resolvi colocar em "Acerca de mim" os meus projectos]
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/member.php?u=801

  13. #13
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
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    Canon's new EOS 80D DSLR takes aim at semi-professional crowd



    Digital cameras may have taken a back seat to the sheer convenience afforded by smartphone cameras but make no mistake; there's still a market for interchangeable lens cameras, even at the non-professional level.
    Case in point is Canon's new EOS 80D, a follow-up to 2013's EOS 70D. This semi-professional DSLR features a 24.2-megapixel APS-C CMOS sensor, a DIGIC 6 image processor and a 45-point autofocus system. The camera can shoot at up to seven frames per second and includes creature comforts such as Anti-Flicker shooting and built-in Wi-Fi and NFC capabilities that make transferring images and videos much more convenient.

    Those interested in shooting video on the EOS 80D will no doubt appreciate the headphone jack for audio monitoring as well as the ISO range of 100 to 12800 (expandable to 25600). It'll capture video in 1080p Full HD MP4 format at up to 60 frames per second, up from the 30 fps limit of the 70D, and offers several creative filters like old movie, fantasy, memory, miniature and dramatic monochrome. There's even a Movie Servo AF option that lets shooters adjust the autofocus speed.

    Canon says the new EOS 80D will be available sometime next month priced at $1,199 for the body only. It'll also be sold with a new EF-S18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM lens for $1,799. Optionally, the lens can be had for $599.99 by itself.
    Noticia:
    http://www.techspot.com/news/63855-c...-aim-semi.html
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  14. #14
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
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    Nikon joins premium compact camera market with new DL series




    Cameras built into mobile phones first encroached on the territory of standalone digital cameras in the early 2000s but it would be many years before they were considered a threat. These days, it's next to impossible to find a smartphone without a camera.
    While one could argue that convenience alone trumps all other aspects, smartphone cameras can't yet compare to the quality afforded by a respectable standalone digital camera – especially a DSLR or mirrorless camera. But what if you aren't that into photography, would rather not fool with swapping lenses or simply want a great camera without all the bulk?
    Nikon's latest line of point-and-shoot digital cameras may be just what you're after.
    The new DL series is comprised of three compact fixed-lens cameras that cover the most common focal ranges. The DL18-50, DL24-85 and DL24-500 feature wide, mid-range and super telephoto zoom ranges of 18-50mm, 24-85mm and 24-500mm, respectively, and all utilize Nikon's 20.8-megapixel 1-inch "CX" BSI CMOS sensor (the same one found in the Nikon 1 series) mated to an Expeed 6A image processor.

    The DL18-50 and the DL24-85 both feature a variable f/1.8-2.8 aperture and four stops of stabilization while the DL24-500 offers a variable f/2.8-5.6 aperture and five stops of stabilization. As you'd expect, the DL18-50 and DL24-85 are pocketable; the DL24-500, not so much.
    Each model offers RAW image capture and 20fps continuous shooting as well as 4K video recording at up to 30fps and slow-motion capture at 120fps (1080p) and 240fps (720p). All three cameras also utilize Nikon's BridgeSnap system which leans on both Wi-Fi and Bluetooth to speed up wireless transfers. Hot shoes can be found on all three models.

    Nikon says the DL18-50 will ship this summer priced at $849.95 while the DL24-85 will set you back $649.95. The superzoom DL24-500, meanwhile, will command $999.95 when it arrives this summer. Personally, I'd opt for something in the mirrorless category that affords the added flexibility of an interchangeable lens camera but as cameras like the Sony RX100 III have demonstrated, the market for fixed-lens point-and-shoots still very much exists.
    Noticia:
    http://www.techspot.com/news/63894-n...et-new-dl.html
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  15. #15
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
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    Gizcam Redfox Handheld Stabilizer Brings Out The Photographer In You Through Smartphones

    There are several manufacturers out there that incorporated OIS chips in their devices to remove blurred out images from the equation. Unfortunately, not every smartphone camera features an OIS chip, meaning that your images and videos can end up becoming too shaky for your liking. This is the why Gizcam Redfox has been made, to eliminate this issue indefinitely.

    Gizcam Redfox Has Been Made For Both Smartphones And Action Cameras – See All Of Its Features Here

    Where mirror and mirrorless cameras become too bulky to carry around, photography junkies have relied on their mobile devices and action cameras to capture images and footage. With Gizcam Redfox, the handheld stabilizer helps to prevent the user from capturing shaky images and videos, and according to the company, the result comes out like you would be capturing images and videos standing while standing still. The product has a weight of 430 grams (for the action cam version, it weighs in at 338 grams), meaning that your hands will not feel strained after carrying it for an extended period of time.








    It also features a 3,000mAh battery that can keep Redfox functional for a period of 10 hours. One added benefit of the handheld stabilizer is that it will also act as a power bank and supply your smartphone with power from the gimbal. Since its form factor appears more like a selfie stick, it will also enable you to capture portraits from your smartphone without ever touching the buttons present on your handset. As of right now, there are three different modes which have been listed below:

    • Locking mode
    • Heading follow mode
    • Pitching mode







    In areas where there is immense amount of wind or if you are moving severely, then the control accuracy of the motor is around 0.02 degrees, and is able to adapt accordingly to the surrounding environment in order to capture the best possible footage. This will also require you to keep your hand still since you cannot expect the entire gadget to do the work for you.
    According to the manufacturer, it supports Bluetooth connectivity and currently has two official models; one that supports smartphones, and the other that supports action cams. Keep in mind that you cannot use a smartphone and action cam in a single device and you will have to purchase them separately according to the gadget that you will end up using. Pricing details of both models have been listed below along with which devices it is compatible with.
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    Gizcam Redfox smartphone compatibility list (costs $299.99):

    • iPhone 5s
    • iPhone 6s
    • iPhone 6s Plus










    Gizcam Redfox action camera compatibility list (costs $259.99)

    • GoPro Hero 4
    • GoPro Hero 3+
    • GoPro Hero 3
    • Xiaomi Yi action camera
    • Any other action camera that possesses similar dimensions to the ones listed above


    Do you think Gizcam Redfox will do the job in snapping stabilized images and videos? Let us know your thoughts.
    Source


    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

 

 
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