Registar
Página 2 de 13 PrimeiroPrimeiro 123412 ... ÚltimoÚltimo
Resultados 16 a 30 de 181

Tópico: Ratos

  1. #16
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
    Registo
    Nov 2013
    Local
    City 17
    Posts
    30,005
    Avaliação
    1 (100%)
    The Best Computer Mice: Best overall, best for gaming, wireless/portable & budget choices

    We spend several hours a day interacting with computers, so having the right tools at hand is serious business. Deciding on the best mouse is a subjective process where several things come into play, such as intended use, feature set, price and how comfortable it feels in your hand and grip style. Over the years we’ve tested some of the best mice on the market, but to come up with this list we combined our own experience with hundreds of reviews and customer feedback across the web, to bring you our choices for the best overall mouse, best gaming mouse, best wireless / portable mouse and a handful of budget picks.
    Best Overall

    Razer DeathAdder Chroma

    In numbers
    Price: $50

    TechSpot Metascore: 83


    User Reviews: 8.6



    Great | Differentiating Features
    Sober, aesthetically pleasing design. Performs superbly in everyday tasks as well as gaming. Configurable lighting.
    Good | Most Have It
    Accurate sensor. Very comfortable and ergonomic. Straightforward and simple to use software. Braided cable.
    Average | Competitors May Be Better
    No on-the-fly DPI switching. No on-board storage, though Razer's cloud storage works well.
    The Razer DeathAdder has had a handful of iterations the last few years (without changing much, and definitely not its shape) and every time it’s consistently mentioned as one of the top pick for gamers, especially if you play first-person shooters. But even if you’re not big on gaming we like this mouse so much that we’ve selected it as our best overall pick. It tracks movement with flawless accuracy, its buttons are large and offer just enough resistance while responding with a satisfying click; its notched scroll wheel feels and works great.
    The Deathadder's latest revision is called 'Chroma', adding customizable lighting and an upgraded sensor. If that's not worth the extra $10-20 for you, the previous 2013 model is almost the same and an outstanding value at $40.
    The Chroma's DPI can be adjusted in increments of 100 all the way up to 10,000 (or up to 6,400 on the DeathAdder 2013). There’s no dedicated button to adjust DPI settings on the fly, but Razer’s software lets you save different profiles which you can cycle through using a button on the bottom of the mouse -- though it’s not an ideal location if you’re in the middle of a gaming session. Other features on the software side include the ability to program macros to tie different key combos to a single click of the mouse.
    In terms of design, the DeathAdder is shaped to accommodate the curve of the hand and its body is a rubbery matte black plastic that’ll keep your hand from sweating. There are also a couple of textured pad areas on both sides for the thumb and two non-dominant fingers to ensure a good grip. Your opinion may vary on how comfortable a mouse is depending on your grip style and hand size, but most reviewers (including us) agree the mouse is extremely comfortable to use even in extended gaming sessions, and at 105 grams it slides easily across a mousing surface.
    Razer offers a left-handed version of the Deathadder, too. It should be noted though this model hasn’t received all the updates as its right-hand counterpart, so the sensor only goes up to 3,500 DPI and the sides of the mouse have a smoother plastic finish instead of a rubbery grip.
    If you want something a little more substancial -- or perhaps just a high end wireless alternative -- the Logitech MX Master is a great pick, albeit pricier at $80. The MX Master is a big mouse but it doesn't feel 'fat' and it features a perfectly sculpted shape that supports your hand and wrist in a comfortable, natural position. It's precise and highly customizable. The Darkfield Laser sensor can be set as low as 400 and as high as 1600 in increments of 200 DPI, and it tracks flawlessly on a range of surfaces. You also get five programmable buttons, a clever speed-adaptive scroll wheel, a thumb wheel and the ability to connect to three different devices using Bluetooth.



    Best Gaming Mouse

    Logitech G502 Proteus Core

    In numbers
    Price: $58

    TechSpot Metascore: 93


    User Reviews: 9.0



    Great | Differentiating Features
    Customizable weights system. Dual-mode scroll wheel. 4K-friendly 12,000 DPI sensor. Surface calibration software. Eleven programmable buttons.
    Good | Most Have It
    Comfortable and ergonomic design. Large, well placed buttons are easy to reach. Braided cable. Capable, easy to use software. On the fly DPI switching.
    Average | Competitors May Be Better
    May sit a little low for someone with a large hand and a preference for the palm grip. Do you really need 12,000 DPI?
    Logitech's G502 Proteus Core is a customizable beast of a mouse that can accommodate to various gaming styles. The marquee feature is its DPI range that goes from 200 to a whopping 12,000 -- which is frankly overkill even at 3840 x 2160 -- and it’s adjustable on the fly so you can go from fast-paced close quarters action to slower more precise sniping. It has a total of eleven programmable buttons, the classic Logitech dual-mode scroll wheel for buttery smooth or notched motion, and five chevron-shaped 3.6g weights that let you adjust not just how much weight to add but to offset it to one side or the other.
    Thanks to its large, spaced buttons, the mouse performs well in various game genres including first-person shooter (FPS), real-time strategy, action/adventure and massively multiplayer online (MMO) games.
    Design-wise it has a distinct gaming look that not everyone will love -- hard edges, LED lights, and a blue accent along the side -- but beyond aesthetics it is extremely comfortable to hold. Both sides of the mouse are coated in a rubberised material to enhance grip and the surface of the mouse allows for air movement under your hand to reduce sweaty palms.
    Logitech’s Gaming Software allows you to calibrate the sensor for different surfaces and setup different profiles -- up to three can be saved internally using the built-in storage. It can also scan for games on your PC and automatically create profiles for them. The Logitech G502 Proteus Core currently hovers around $60 (as much as $20 below its launch price), making it a good value for the specs and features you're getting.
    For about $15 less the Logitech G402 Hyperion Fury is a leaner version of the Proteus Core that loses some customisable buttons (8 instead of 11) and the weights system. The physical shape and aesthetics of the G402 are similar to the G502, which is to say it's extremely comfortable to hold. The resting place for your thumb is reduced in size but still provides plenty of support. It’s a quality FPS gaming mouse, with superb tracking abilities. It can go from 240 to 4,000 DPI and its standout spec is a tracking speed of 500 inches-per-second -- which, realistically, you won’t ever achieve.
    If you want something optimized specifically for MMO games the Razer Naga offers a total of 19 buttons -- twelve of them on the side in four rows of thumb buttons. Each one of these buttons rest at a different elevation due to the curvature of the mouse, making it easier to tell them apart. The Naga uses the same Razer Synapse software as the DeathAdder and the mouse itself is very responsive and accurate at up to 8,200 DPI. It'll set you back $65.

    Toda a review:
    http://www.techspot.com/bestof/mice/
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  2. #17
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
    Registo
    Nov 2013
    Local
    City 17
    Posts
    30,005
    Avaliação
    1 (100%)
    Mouse Roundup Winter 2015

    In our final peripherals roundup for this year (you can find lnks to headsets and keyboard at the end of this article) we gather together some of the best mice currently available. Split into different categories it should help identify the best mouse for your needs (or budget). Welcome to our Mouse Roundup Winter 2015.
    Mouse Roundup Winter 2015 – Best for multi buttons

    Corsair Scimitar

    It would be fair to say that Corsair have been hugely successful at entering new market segments. From PSUs to cases to peripherals they have consistently created quality products to add to their original memory business. With one of their latest mice they have created a super cool device which looks to offer loads of extra buttons… thats nothing new. What is, is that you can vary the position of them to better suit your thumb. Nice!
    As for the key feature, those thumb buttons… flawless. The overall height of the buttons feels great on our thumb. The varied texture really helps to identify them and they all have nice tactile click from the mechanical tech beneath. How does the variable feature work? Great. Its quick to change and the range of movement should be more than enough to suit the vast majority of users.
    Read the full Scimitar review.
    Mouse Roundup Winter 2015 – No frills done right

    Mionix Castor

    Sometimes you just want a nice simple mouse. No frills… ok maybe a couple of thumb buttons and quick access to DPI changes. Those are really basic features nowadays though, right? Good, glad we agree. So that’s where the Mionix Castor sits, a nice decent DPI, good build quality and the basic buttons needed. All at a good, competitive price.
    The design and build quality of the mouse itself is also good. The Mionix note that the rubber/soft touch coating is four layers thick which should make it durable and the finish on our sample was flawless. We very much like the contoured right side which was very comfortable for palm grip and the angle of the left side was near perfect for our hand with that textured rubber giving a decent grip. The mouse weight is also good, a nice light mouse overall … … Speed was more than adequate for all our needs and we noticed no issues with various surfaces.
    Read the full Castor review.
    Mouse Roundup Winter 2015 – Best Wireless

    Razer Mamba 16000 DPI

    Although we have put the new Mamba in as our best wireless, it’s actually our favourite mouse of the year too. Crazy fast, good software, great build quality. The only caveat is that if you need lots of buttons then this isnt the device for you. It also has this funky feature where you can set the resistance of the mouse clicks and when charging on the desktop dock it looks phenomenal.
    On the sensor front, the 16000 DPI sensor is ridiculously fast when at full. Most users are probably not going to go far above 12500… at least that’s where we started to notice our accuracy dropping off. Tracking was flawless throughout our testing.
    Read the full Mamba Review.
    Mouse Roundup Winter 2015 – Lefties and something different…

    There is a lot of righty action going on so far… so it’s worth noting that for those who want a nice basic mouse in an ambidextrous design the Roccat Kova (2016 edition) is a potential option. Through their EasyShift tech it is possible to assign a whole bunch of functions to the buttons available (22 functions in total). And then if you just want something a bit crazy (in a good way) then consider their Nyth mouse. Not only does it arrive with a selection of interchangeable thumb buttons (support for 3D printing of your own too) and interchangeable side panel… its got a fin! Talk about going the extra nautical mile…

    Read about the Kova or the Nyth.
    Be sure to check out our headset and keyboard roundups too!
    Summary
    Reviewer
    Stuart Davidson
    Review Date

    Reviewed Item
    Mouse Roundup Winter 2015
    Author Rating


    Noticia:
    http://www.hardwareheaven.com/2015/1...p-winter-2015/
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  3. #18
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
    Registo
    Nov 2013
    Local
    City 17
    Posts
    30,005
    Avaliação
    1 (100%)
    Best Gaming Mice of 2015 – Which One Will You be Buying?

    Picking the right gaming mouse can be a tricky task as there are virtually countless brands on the market offering a staggeringly huge range of mice in seemingly every shape, colour, size and budget you can think of, so where do you even get started?
    We’ve had a dig around for some of our favourite gaming mice, albeit with a slight focus on more recent models, giving you a good impression of what’s currently available on the market and with any luck, help you find the one that is right for you. Of course, which is best is a matter of personal opinion, one may have a better sensor, but you may prefer the look or grip of another, it’s about finding what’s best for you and your requirements.
    As you can see from the list below (and the image above), we’ve got quite a selection of great gaming mice at our disposal, and we’re confident that no matter which you choose, you’ll be very happy with it as these are all great products in their own respects. We’ve got a wide range of budgets covered too, from around £20 to well over £100! Let’s get on with the fun stuff and take a closer look at what each of these gaming mice has to offer!

    • CM Storm Xornet II
    • Zowie FK1
    • Ozone Argon Ocelote World
    • CM Storm Sentinel III
    • Logitech G502 Proteus Core
    • Corsair Scimitar RGB
    • TteSports Ventus X
    • G.Skill Ripjaws MX780
    • Roccat Tyon


    CM Storm Xornet II

    A lightweight and compact mouse design that is well suited to fast-paced gameplay, the Xornet II is a great little gaming mouse. The compact design lends well to fingertip and claw grip play styles, making it a great weapon for twitchy FPS shooters, but it’s also very well suited to younger gamers who naturally have a smaller grip and hand size, so it’s a popular option for the Minecraft generation. The buttons are light and responsive too, which is great for frantic MOBA sessions.
    With a smooth optical sensor, with three programmable DPI levels, as well as an adjustable lift-off height, fully programmable buttons and a little bit of full RGB flair, it’s a versatile tool for gaming and day-to-day desktop use, at a price that’s certainly attractive; it’s actually one of the cheapest in our round-up today.

    • Buttons: 7
    • Sensor: Avago 3320 Optical
    • Min DPI: 250
    • Max DPI: 3500
    • Macro Engine*]Built-in Storage*]Weight: 132g
    • Grip: Claw and Fingertip
    • Price: £19.99

    Check out our full review here

    Zowie FK1

    Zowie has a very respectable reputation in the pro gaming scene, offering a range of mice that are loved by gamers at home and in the eSports industry. A lightweight and nimble design, as well as large slipmats, give the FK1 exceptional glide and agility, combined with comfortable ergonomics, responsive switches and a zero fuss design that lends well to competitive gameplay.
    The flawless deployment of the Avago 3310 Optical Sensor is pixel perfect, something that’ll benefit both work and gameplay, but we find this mouse is at its absolute best in games like CS:GO and we’re certainly not the only gamers to think so.
    There’s no desktop software, the DPI selector is on the base of the mouse, offering up 450/1150/2300DPI and the ergonomic left-and-right handed design can be toggled back and forth directly on the mouse, so no need to worry about setup, you can just plug it in and get right on with the action.

    • Buttons: 7
    • Sensor: Avago 3310 Optical
    • Min DPI: 450
    • Max DPI: 2300
    • Macro Engine: No
    • Built-in Storage: No
    • Weight: 90g
    • Grip: Claw
    • Price: £49.99

    Check out our full review here

    Ozone Argon Ocelote World

    Another mouse with an eSports pedigree, the Ozone Argon is a great gaming mouse, but we like their special edition which was designed by legendary pro gamer Ocelote. Equipped with a pin point accurate Laser sensor, a switchable ambidextrous design, on the fly DPI switching, grippy side panels and 9 fully programmable buttons, the Argon has all the features you could likely ever need or want from a gaming mouse.
    The stylish and lightweight design is certainly appealing, but you can also benefit from a weight tuning system that allows you to customise the glide and balance of the mouse to best suit your play style. While not the cheapest or most expensive mouse here today, you will struggle to find better value for money than what Ozone have to offer here.

    • Buttons: 9
    • Sensor: ADNS 9800
    • Min DPI: 100
    • Max DPI: 8200
    • Macro Engine: Yes
    • Built-in Storage: 128KB / 5 Profiles
    • Weight: 125g + optional 4 x 4.5g
    • Grip: Claw
    • Price: £42.32

    Check out our full review here

    CM Storm Sentinel III

    Cooler master is the only brand we have in this list twice, so you can be certain that there’s a good reason for doing so. Their recently released Sentinel III is their latest and greatest Sentinel gaming mouse yet, with practically every aspect of the mouse having been improved upon, especially the build quality, without ruining what we loved about the original.
    The Sentinel III ticks all the right boxes for a desktop mouse, with an accurate sensor, fully programmable buttons, comprehensive software, a built-in OLED display for DPI and profile readout, weight tuning system, on-board memory, full RGB lighting and more, making it as versatile for office work, as it is for competitive gaming; a solid all-round mouse.

    • Buttons: 8
    • Sensor: Avago 3988
    • Min DPI: 400
    • Max DPI: 6400
    • Macro Engine: Yes
    • Built-in Storage: 512KB / 5 Profiles
    • Weight: 115g + optional 22.5g
    • Grip: Palm
    • Price: £39.99

    Check out our full review here

    Logitech G502 Proteus Core

    There are a lot of things I can say about this mouse and every single on of them is positive. Without a doubt, the G502 is one of the best gaming mice in the world today and comes with all the latest features you would expect from a flagship gaming mouse.
    Equipped with what may very well be the best sensor we’ve ever tested, the accuracy of the G502 is unmatched. With extensive customisation options available via the desktop software, 11 fully programmable buttons, a sniper mode button, on-board memory for saving your profiles, full RGB lighting, a weight tuning system, as well as the iconic unlockable scroll wheel that has been a popular feature for Logitech mice and so much more, there isn’t a thing that the G502 wouldn’t be perfect for.
    It’s a little more expensive that some other options, but the saying that you get what you pay for rings loud and clear here, and I think it’ll be a long time before we see a better mouse on the market.

    • Buttons: 11
    • Sensor: Exclusive Delta Zero 12,000DPI
    • Min DPI: 200
    • Max DPI: 12,000
    • Macro Engine: Yes
    • Built-in Storage: Yes / 3 Profiles
    • Weight: 121g + optional 5 x 3.6g
    • Grip: Palm
    • Price: £54.99

    Check out our full review here

    Corsair Scimitar RGB

    The world of MMO and RPG gaming can be quite demanding, with complex commands and more often than not, a control setup that uses virtually every key on the keyboard and mouse. The help gain more control and speed over the competition, the Scimitar deploys a fantastic mechanical keypad on the side of the mouse, giving you a frightening amount of flexibility for deploying macros, cooldown timers, shortcuts and more, giving you the edge over the competition when you’re in the middle of a complex raid mission.
    On top of the monstrous amount of buttons, it’s also a fantastic looking mouse, with some of the coolest RGB lighting that you’ll find on any gaming mouse. Snappy and responsive switches, comprehensive software features, built-in memory and a fantastic sensor make the Scimitar a powerful weapon for control-intensive gaming.

    • Buttons: 17
    • Sensor: Optical
    • Min DPI: 100
    • Max DPI: 12,000
    • Macro Engine: Yes
    • Built-in Storage: Yes
    • Weight: 147g
    • Grip: Palm / Claw
    • Price: £69.99

    Check out our full review here

    TteSports Ventus X

    One of the more affordable mice on our list today, the Ventus X is a great all-round mouse that may not have all of the crazy features of some of the products we’ve suggested so far, but it certainly has all the basics right.
    A smooth sensor, snappy and response switches, comfortable ergonomics, a new grip coating and durable rubber grip side panels, weight tuning system, LED lighting, hand ventilation, macro engine and more make it suitable for a wide range of gaming and work applications, it also looks pretty stylish too.
    The laser sensor may not be the highest grade on this list, but you’ll find it gives silky smooth results right across the range, giving you excellent accuracy. Combined with the effortless glide and tunable weight, it’s easy to use even after many hours of gaming.

    • Buttons: 6
    • Sensor: Avago 9500 Laser
    • Min DPI: 100
    • Max DPI: 5700
    • Macro Engine: Yes
    • Built-in Storage: 128KB
    • Weight: 155g + Optional 3 x 4.5g
    • Grip: Palm / Claw
    • Price: £30.65

    Check out our full review here

    G.Skill Ripjaws MX780

    G.Skill may be relatively new to the peripherals market, having spent years making award-winning memory products, but the MX780 is proof that they’re able to deliver the same relentless high-quality and performance in a new market. The MX780 is not only one of the best-looking mice we’ve ever seen, it’s also packed full of fantastic features, such as the removable side panels that allow you to tweak the ergonomics, or turn it from a right to left-handed mouse.
    All the high-end features you would expect are here, RGB lighting, high-quality sensor and switches, weight tuning system and more, all topped off by the fantastic laser sensor, making this a great gaming mouse for a wide range of users, play styles and more.

    • Buttons: 8
    • Sensor: Avago Laser
    • Min DPI: 100
    • Max DPI: 8200
    • Macro Engine: Yes
    • Built-in Storage: 512KB
    • Weight: 111g + optional 2 x 4.5g
    • Grip: Palm
    • Price: £59.62

    Check out our full review here

    Roccat Tyon

    The Tyon is an easy mouse for me to recommend, as it has been my mouse of choice for a year now and I’ve no intention of swapping it out anytime soon. The sensor is great, offering up to 8200 DPI and the rather fantastic software from Roccat is, in my opinion, the best on the market.
    Customising the mouse with macros, RGB lighting effects, the sensor performance and more is easily done and with the addition of a dual switch fin on the top, a button on the wing, extra buttons next to the LMB and RMB, as well as an analogue thumb controller, the Tyon is an unrivaled mouse for FPS gaming; especially for games like Battlefield, where those extra buttons are great for controlling vehicles.

    • Buttons: 16
    • Sensor: Pro-AM R3 Laser
    • Min DPI: 50
    • Max DPI: 8200
    • Macro Engine: Yes
    • Built-in Storage: 576kb
    • Weight*]Grip: Palm / Claw
    • Price: £72.62

    Check out our full review here

    Razer Mamba 2015 – 16,000 DPI

    Razer is one of the most recognisable gaming brands in the world, proving a popular choice for gamers at home, as well as many members of the eSports community. Razer claimed their new Mamba mouse was one of the most advanced mice ever created and while it comes with the price tag to reflect this, it delivers on features and performance that help justify the investment.
    Capable of being used wirelessly and wired, with incredible RGB lighting effects, a fully programmable button layout, one of the best sensors you could ever imagine on a mouse and so much more. Capable of performing at up to 16,000 DPI, there’s no doubt this sensor can provide you with everything you need and more. However, the best features, at least in my opinion, is the adjustable click responses on the left and right mouse buttons. Wants them fast and light or clicky and heavy? Not a problem, just turn the screw and get them just how you like them.

    • Buttons: 9 + tilt-click scroll wheel
    • Sensor: Razer 5G Laser
    • Min DPI: 50
    • Max DPI: 16,000
    • Macro Engine: Yes
    • Built-in Storage: Yes
    • Weight: 125g
    • Grip: Palm / Claw
    • Price: £134.99

    Check out our full review here
    Noticia:
    http://www.eteknix.com/best-gaming-m...you-be-buying/
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  4. #19
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
    Registo
    Nov 2013
    Local
    City 17
    Posts
    30,005
    Avaliação
    1 (100%)
    Corsair Katar Optical Gaming Mouse Review

    Corsair Katar Optical Gaming Mouse Introduction:

    I'm late to the console world in getting my Xbox One over the Black Friday/Cyber Monday sales, so I've been enjoying my time well spent playing Forza 6. I'm usually a PC gamer, but there are a few things that are just better in the console world. Not to start that argument, but where I am going with this is my new nano controller I got for the Xbox One. I have small hands, so when I can pick up a small controller, life is good. Same applies to the PC world; sometimes I want a small mouse, one that fits said small hands. Today I get to share with you the Corsair Katar Optical Gaming Mouse. It is just that - a smaller handed mouse.
    Now the name of this mouse I also found fitting, while also feeling a bit Klingon-esque like the bat'leth. Turns out, Katar is also a weapon, technically meaning dagger, originating in India as a small dagger blade representing a sort of status symbol. Perhaps that isn't the meaning Corsair was looking for, but the Katar gaming mouse is a nice, smaller mouse that perhaps could show some status.
    Most companies in the gaming peripheral market have a tiered price range for the products. This doesn't mean the most expensive is the best, nor the cheapest the worst. The Katar is Corsair's cheaper mouse right now, but it isn't lacking the typical Corsair zombie killing build. Its MSRP is $39.99, and for the market that isn't terrible. The first thing you notice about this mouse, however, which jumped at me before I got it out of the box, is the lack of side buttons. There are only four programmable buttons on this mouse: left, right, middle, and a bonus defaulted to DPI cycling. Let's not panic just yet, but this lessening feature draws me back a few years and has me squirm at having to use a key for melee again or, dare I say, click the back button in browser. So there it is up front – let's talk about what else this mouse does have to offer.
    The latest string of mice from Corsair has the feature of being designed by professional gamers. The Scimitar we took a look at just a week or so ago was featured by pro WoW player Bajheera and this week's Katar is featured by Dong-jin "Helios" Shin. Helios claimed "KATAR has the performance I need, the comfort I want, and all the settings are just a click away." Let's see if all that is true.
    Corsair Katar Optical Gaming Mouse Look:

    The box for the Corsair Katar follows the same design as the Corsair Scimitar we just looked at. The box is mostly black with yellow accents and the true Corsair sails in a shiny, embossed chrome look. The front of the box sports the light weight 85g feature, as well as up to 8000DPI setting. The side of the box lists the package contents, as well as the minimum system requirements to let this plug and play.
    The back of the box is a bit glossy with the layout of the mouse presented, as well as a nice front shot of the mouse to really help you get a feel for what this mouse looks like. Back here we learn of the four programmable click-stability buttons, on-the-fly DPI tuning, and the rubberized tension reducing soft-touch grips. Helios himself is even pictured on the back here with a quote for use of the Katar. Let's get this box opened up!
    Opening the box involved removing a small circular sticky simply by pulling it off or, if I'd had a knife handy, cutting along the edge. The box inside is bright yellow, matching the box highlights. I don't know why, but I actually really like this bright yellow more than your typical stock brown box. Back to my usual self, if I'm paying for the box, I want my money in the mouse!
    Out of the box is the mouse with the cable twisted up and a warranty pamphlet and quick start guide. Tossing the pamphlets to the side, like many of you will, let us get a better look at the mouse…
    Toda a review:
    http://www.overclockersclub.com/revi..._gaming_mouse/
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  5. #20
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
    Registo
    Nov 2013
    Local
    City 17
    Posts
    30,005
    Avaliação
    1 (100%)
    Corsair Gaming Scimitar RGB mouse review

    If you ever thought that most gaming mice do not have enough buttons for you then Corsair’s new Scimitar MMO/MOBA mouse is probably what you need. It incorporates 12 side buttons as well as the usual ones at the front end. The optical sensor has a class leading 12,000 DPI rating.
    As you would expect from a contemporary high end mouse it also comes fitted with RGB LEDs, powerful back end software and some innovative, ergonomic styling.

    This is a complete package that will certainly cater to a specific audience who demand a complex button layout. We think it looks rather impressive too, as shown in the picture above.
    Features and Specifications

    • 12,000 DPI sensitivity – optical sensor.
    • 12 button key slider.
    • Four zone dynamic RGB lighting.
    • Front mounted cable protector.
    • Braided cabling.
    • Ergonomic design.
    • Supports powerful back-end Corsair Utility software.
    Toda a review:
    http://www.kitguru.net/peripherals/m...-mouse-review/
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  6. #21
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
    Registo
    Nov 2013
    Local
    City 17
    Posts
    30,005
    Avaliação
    1 (100%)
    Razer Diamondback Chroma Mouse Review

    The Razer Diamondback is a legendary mouse for a niche audience, those who reject the short, fat gaming mice that now dominate the market. It debuted in 2004, and its long, thin body and ambidextrous grip made it perfect for those with a claw grip and love to lift and move their mice. After laying dormant for a few years Razer has brought it back, imbuing the mouse with the company's Chroma LED styling. But the new Diamondback has some very big (and very specific) shoes to fill.




    At $89, the Diamondback is priced to compete with some of the best offerings from rivals such as Corsair, Steelseries and Zowie. At that price, you get the expected build quality—the Diamondback is solid and feels fantastic on your index and middle fingers. The textured grip on each side is pleasant, and the symmetrical buttons make it a true balanced ambidextrous product.


    Razer's Chroma lighting has been an interesting addition to the company's product line, giving users fine control over the colour of their mouse, keyboard, headset, and even their mousepad. The Diamondback gets the full Chroma treatment and has some of the best lighting of any mouse we've tested. A thin line of light raps around the equator of the mouse, and can be programmed to a variety of RGB colours and patterns along with a separate Razer logo on the palmrest.


    The scrollwheel, which has its own illumination, has a functional, grippy textury with distinct scroll steps and a satisfying middle click. The main buttons are also well-done, with light and quick actuation on both the left and right click. Even though your hand naturally sits a bit higher on the mouse, the mouse has two grooves that keep your fingers centered on the buttons.

    The Diamondback's glide feet are smooth, the braided cable is light, and the primary switches are fantastic. Weighing 89 grams, it's in a perfect weight zone for a mouse designed to be lifted and moved. The 16,000-DPI laser sensor is a bit of a surprise, considering the original Diamondback had one of the first optical gaming sensors.


    The body of the Diamondback is long and low, designed for those who hold their mouse with a claw grip. This is already a narrow audience, and Razer has made a few mistakes with the design that might turn some of them away. Because of the curved sides, the base of the Diamondback has a significantly smaller surface area than the top. Your thumb sits awkwardly against the side of the mouse with little support, and the textured grip is wasted as your ring and pinkie fingers have nowhere to lay. That means your fingers can get stuck to the mat when moving it around, and the small base also makes the Diamondback seem precarious and tippy.


    All of that to say: the Diamondback has a substantial learning curve. The mouse demands changes like bumping up the DPI settings to minimize movement, lifting the mouse to avoid tipping it over, and changing your grip to handle that lifting without touching the side buttons. This is a niche product, and for some that may not be an issue. But some of these design choices will be a challenge even for those who wished for the Diamondback's return.
    Toda a review:
    http://www.hardwarecanucks.com/forum...se-review.html
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  7. #22
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
    Registo
    Nov 2013
    Local
    City 17
    Posts
    30,005
    Avaliação
    1 (100%)
    EPICGEAR ZORA IR LED Gaming Mouse Review

    Introduction, Specifications, and Pricing


    It has been quite some time since we were last sent a sample from Epicgear. In fact, it has been since the release of the Meduza mouse that we saw back in early 2012. In all of that time, it appears as if they have developed six other mice since, and are now offering us a look at their latest design. In the mouse we are about to see, we do find influence too from previous designs that had influence in this mouse, yet at the same time, it is a product that can stand on its own.


    What we saw with the Meduza was a highly advanced mouse with dual sensors and all sorts of fancy bells and whistles to make your gaming experience as enjoyable as possible. As we get our first glance at the latest product to hit the lab, we find that this time Epicgear is offering a straightforward design for right handed users. This does not mean that the design is simple or that it arrives stripped down of its feature set. In fact, we were delivered a full on gaming peripheral with many light zones, the ability to change one of them, and software that comes along to allow users to define what suits them best.

    The name of this product sends us back to days long gone in gaming as we recall the name Zora coming from The Legend of Zelda, and judging from the graphics on the packaging; we have to be on the right track here. It is just a shame that with all the markets Epicgear does cover, it just so happens that the North American continent is not yet in their scope of availability. For everyone else on this big blue ball, though, Epicgear does offer this design in abundance, and it is a mouse well worth having a look at.


    As we mentioned, there is a 3500 DPI sensor on board that happens to be the Avago ADNS A3050 and offers an EG-tuned precision lens and firmware for it. There is a button to change DPI on-the-fly that get mentioned, and then it is into the sensor specifications. It is explained that this IR LED sensor can track sixty inches per second at 20Gs. It includes an adjustable polling rate that starts at 125Hz and can be raised to 1000Hz or 1ms. We mentioned the software it comes with, but did not touch on the Macro options, nor did we cover that six buttons of the seven can be programmed, across various profiles as well.

    Lighting is offered in four locations. There is the scroll wheel LED that changes depending on the profile being used, but can also be customized. The DPI indicator, the "eG" logo on the heel, and there is even the Zora name that lights up, but the latter three remain red all the time. There is a lock-down function to turn off the DPI selector button if desired while gaming. We then move back to more technical aspects of the 1.8 meters of braided cable that terminates in a gold-plated USB 2.0 connection. Its 126.5mm length, 66.5mm width, and 40mm height are addressed, and they offer a weight of 110 grams, but that is without the extra weighting system. Speaking of which, that system contains four metal slabs that are five grams in weight each. The last bit of information shows us that the Epicgear Zora ships with a two-year warranty.

    Since we cannot locate the Zora on this side of the pond, we did shop around on the other side of the globe for a pricing reference with some actual listing. It just so happens that we fell into Caseking.de first and found the Zora listed there at €46.90. Converting that into greenbacks for those on this side of the globe, that is roughly $50. It is a shame that there is not availability over here, because at this sort of a price point, and in what we have been told this mouse offers, there does seem to be a very high feature set to investment ratio found here. Either way, for those of you who can access it, and for those of you who cannot, we will still deliver our opinion on the Zora from Epicgear and see just how well it stacks up against many other more expensive solutions.


    Chad's Peripherals Test System Specifications

    Toda a review:
    http://www.tweaktown.com/reviews/748...iew/index.html
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  8. #23
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
    Registo
    Nov 2013
    Local
    City 17
    Posts
    30,005
    Avaliação
    1 (100%)
    James Donkey 007: Funky Mouse With A Weird Name, Hands On

    It’s a funky mouse with a weird name. The James Donkey 007 gaming mouse offers numerous external, swappable pieces that let you customize the feel and fit. That’s the elevator pitch, anyway. In real life, this is a thoroughly enjoyable mouse to fiddle with. It’s (mostly) well designed, the build quality immediately strikes you as superb, and it has several subtle features (such as its lighting) that offer additional small touches that make it that much more appealing.
    However, it’s big, and it’s heavy, and it’s not for everyone. But it has 11 different pieces (three for the right wing, three for the left wing, three for the rear, and two for the base) that give you numerous configuration options. (I’ll dig into that a little further down the page.)


    Specifications

    The most notable specs of the James Donkey 007 are perhaps the dimensions and weight. The weight range is listed as 100-150g; that 100g is the weight of the skeleton, with no armor attached. In any case, a fully-dressed James Donkey 007 (nope, still not tired of writing that) weighs in at 150g. For comparison, the flyweight Mionix Castor is a hair under 94g.
    Because of the multitude of armor options, the dimensions will differ depending on how you have the mouse configured, but the maximum is 135 x 93 x 41.6 mm (which is large, but not ridiculously so).
    James Donkey 007 Gaming Mouse
    Sensor -Avago A9800 laser sensor
    -Up to 30g acceleration
    Resolution Up to 8200 dpi
    Grips Multitude of options
    Ambitextrous No (right only)
    Polling Rate Up to 1,000 Hz (125, 250, 500, and 1,000 Hz)
    Onboard Memory 16 Kb
    Programmable Buttons 7 (or 8, depending on configuration)
    Switches -L/R buttons: Omron (20 million clicks)
    -Three tactile switches (1 million clicks)
    Lighting -4-5 lighting zones (depending on configuration)
    -No RBG
    -Static white/orange/red default
    -10 color options (rear piece only)
    Max Tracking Speed Up to 150 IPS
    Interface USB
    Cable 1.8 m braided
    Dimensions 135 x 93 x 41.6 mm
    Weight 100-150g
    Software James Donkey v1.0.0.17
    Price $69 MSRP


    http://ops.bestofmedia.com/us/ooyala...THS0zgkRtvtJbC
    James Donkey 007 Gaming Mouse And Software, Hands On

    Premium Feel, (Mostly) Superb Design

    The marquee feature of the James Donkey 007 is the customizability, but that should not overshadow the attention to detail here, for which James Donkey should be applauded.
    For starters, the finish is beautiful. It’s reminiscent of metal flake, and it resists fingerprints and grime as well or better than any device I’ve used. The sparkled look is also, simply, quite attractive.
    There’s also some unique lighting onboard. Depending on the configuration you choose, you get a pair of “headlights,” a pair of rear lights, a stylized DPI indicator, a funky string of lights across the palm rest, and one of the optional rear pieces has an illuminated “007” logo. This is no RGB, though, and the colors are mostly static.
    By default, the front and rear lights are white, and the strip across the palm rest are, L to R, orange, white and red. The rear “tail light” is green for some reason, but you can change it to one of 10 preset colors (including white to match most of the rest of the lights).

    However, the biggest design win pertains to James Donkey’s execution of the attachment and removal of the various pieces. The company opted for magnets to hold the pieces on the body of the mouse -- three for each part -- and they feel as secure as if they were glued on when you’re using the 007, but they pop right off with ease when you want them to.
    Each of the three magnets is mounted into a post, and each post fits into a hole on the body (with an eight-pin data connector). Due to the strength of the magnets and the idiot-proof nature of the post/hole design (that makes it impossible to, for example, place a right wing where a left wing would go), you can almost throw a piece at its desired location, and it would snap right into place.
    The DPI buttons -- located just behind the scroll wheel -- are a bit small, but they have a distinctive triangular shape, so you can find them easily with your finger. Behind the DPI selectors is a triangular light, within which are six triangular LEDs (noticing a theme here?). The six lights tell you which DPI stage you’re at.

    Although I’m impressed with the level of detail here, the six lights are only so helpful. You have to remember (or set, and then remember) which configuration of lights matches which DPI setting, and you certainly can’t see anything at a glance. That, plus your hand covers them up, so at the very least, you have to take your hand off of the 007 to see where you are, DPI-wise. (On the other hand, this does give you a way to keep track of your DPI stages without needing to look at the software.)
    The scroll wheel can click or scroll, but it cannot click left to right. It has a smooth rubber finish with sweeping contours that I found both comfortable and sufficiently “grippy.” However, the click sensitivity is problematic, and for some users, it may be a fatal flaw: When I scroll up, I can hardly do so without engaging the click. It’s terribly inconvenient. Perhaps you have a lighter touch than I, but I’ve never had such an issue with any other mouse I’ve used.
    The left and right click buttons are long and slightly concave, which I found eminently comfortable. The left-side forward/back buttons are arguably placed a bit high, but I like the placement. Because the buttons are fairly large, I found it an easy and smooth stroke to roll my thumb upwards slightly to engage them.


    My Personal Journey Through The Process Of Selecting Pieces

    One of the best things about the James Donkey 007 (besides the name) is also one of its most challenging: There are too many configuration options with all these parts. I could write you a tome describing each of the 11 different pieces you can stick on the mouse in loving detail, but I’ll spare us both. Instead, I will briefly describe the characteristics of each and then elaborate on my journey to selecting the combination of pieces that resulted in the ideal configuration for me.
    Right wing
    -J01 RG001 “General:” Less than ideal grip that makes it hard to lift the mouse.
    -J02 RG001 “Hook:” The hook makes sense for grip, but it’s at a weird spot for me--it’s too low for me to get my ring finger underneath it, and my pinky finger isn’t really long enough to “catch” the hook when I lift the mouse.
    -J03 RG001 “Finger Holder:” I have to rest my pinky either on top of it, which feels a little odd and makes my grip something completely flat-fingered, or it forces me into a claw grip; in claw grip, though, it’s actually not bad--my pinky finger tip has a nice notch to grab onto, making it easier to lift and control the mouse.
    Right wingsLeft Wing
    -J01 LF001 (Triangular button): There’s a smaller area for the thumb rest, but it’s nice and snug; I feel like I have strong grip in this configuration. I found the button easy to reach, and I hit it with the tip of my thumb, which gives me a strong feeling of control.
    -J02 LF001 (No button): There’s a slight concavity for your thumb, and if you don’t love the larger thumb rest that extends out 90 degrees from the body of the mouse like the other two left wing parts, this is the piece you want. However, there’s no button.
    -J03 LF001 (Rectangular button): This piece has a nice, huge area on which to rest the thumb. However, I found that I had a hard time reaching the button -- I have to use the inside joint of my thumb, which feels a bit odd.
    Left wingsRear
    -J01 RR001: This part was the “007 James Donkey” lettering all lit up, and it has a lip on the bottom right that aligns with the lip on the left wing parts.
    -J02 RR001: This piece has no lip at all. It is the most compact rear part, though.
    -J03 RR001: The longest of the three rear pieces, this one also has a lip, like the J01 RR001 part.
    Rear piecesBase Cover
    -J01 BT001: This part is black, including the four small “feet” -- two near the front of the mouse, a wide one at the rear, and another small one on the right side, under the thumb rest.
    -J02 BT001: With just three “feet” instead of four -- the right-side foot is omitted -- this piece immediately felt slicker and smoother to me than the other. It also has silver feet instead of black ones.
    FeetWhere I Landed

    With 11 unique pieces of exoskeleton across four different areas of the mouse, the possible combinations are numerous.
    What I did to choose my favorite configuration was to start with one section and rule out what I could. I determined straightaway that I didn’t like the right side “Hook” right wing, and I felt that the “Finger Holder” was just too bulky and made any type of grip uncomfortable. Therefore, I settled on the J01 RG001 “General” part.
    So. Many. Options.From there, I looked for a balance between the right wing and the left wing and rear. I’ve found that I have a penchant for mice with a nice big lip for my thumb, like the 600M, so I tossed out the lip-less J02 LF001 left wing from the get-go. Between the remaining two left wing pieces, I liked the placement of the triangular thumb button on the J01 LF00 over that of the rectangular button on the J03 LF001, so that was that.
    Choosing a rear piece was the toughest decision. I’m a sucker for the sort of lit-up lettering that the J01 RR001 offers, but ultimately I found that the smallest of the three rear parts (the J02 RR001) gave me the most snug palm fit, which gave me the most control and allowed me a little bit of flexibility in my grip. (I’ve said before that I’m somewhat of a lazy gripper; I often maintain a loose grip that morphs from fingertip [when I’m going about my daily work] into a sturdier palm grip [when gaming].)
    I prefered the slicker feel of the silver-footed J02 BT001 base cover immediately, so that decision was an easy one.
    The above is, of course, not to say that the configuration I landed on is the “best” by any means; it’s simply was I found worked best for me, based on the size of my hand and my preferred grip(s).
    I will say, though, that those with smaller hands should probably look elsewhere for a mouse, regardless. Whichever parts you end up snapping onto the skeleton, the James Donkey 007 is a big, heavy mouse. It’s not easy to lift, because in addition to the weight, the body doesn’t give you much to grip, especially on the right side. In the heat of the battle, especially with a sweaty palm, you might find it slipping out of your hand all too easily.
    However, if you have big, strong hands, this mouse will likely be fun to play with. And for some, the heft may be ideal.
    James Donkey Software

    It took me a while to get my hands on the software to accompany the James Donkey 007. I was provided no link to download it, and a search turned up nothing. Finally, I finagled this link from a rep (scroll all the way down to the bottom to find the Dropbox link). A second issue is that the software is in Chinese, although I did manage to find a button in there that let me toggle the language to English.
    The GUI is designed with multiple sections, but no tabs. When you mouse over a given section, it will “animate,” and you can change the various settings. The software allows you to set and store up to six profiles on the mouse itself, which I was told has 16 KB of onboard storage.
    When you hover over the image of the mouse, you can see the names of the various programmable buttons. To the right of that is the Custom Button area, where you can easily add a variety of functions to a given button, including numerous mouse events, keyboard events, media controls, and more, including a whole macro creation dialog box.
    Below that is the Effect area, where you can control the lighting. As described earlier in this article, there’s only so much you can do here, but you can choose between two preset “themes” and how they act; set the color for the optional rear piece and assign a behavior (Constant, Breathing, Color Breathing, Disabled).
    Two kind of neat but completely unnecessary features under Effect are “Jitters” and “Sound.” You can set the left-click button or the fire button (that’s the extra button present on two of three left wings) to vibrate (or, I suppose, “jitter”) when you press them. There are also two sounds you can set -- “The Buzzing” and “Lightning Fast” -- on the adjust DPI or fire buttons.
    These are just sounds of car engines revving. Seriously. It’s unclear if you can add your own imported sounds to this feature.
    Jitter and Sound work only with the rear J03 RR001 piece attached.
    The other primary area of the software is Performance, where you can set the DPI in five stages: 600, 1000, 2000, 3600 or 8200. At each stage, you can use the slider to granularly dial the DPI up or down (and set it), and you can unlink the X and Y axis and adjust them individually, too.
    There are four stage to the Acceleration slider, from Off to Max, but the software does not display any data on the in-between settings. Under Performance, you can also adjust the polling rate (125, 250, 333, 500, 1000 Hz) and adjust the scroll speed in four stages.
    Below the Performance area are Save As, Load File, Restore, Reset All (for when you’ve screwed with the settings so much that you have to bail yourself out) and Apply (which doesn’t seem to be necessary, as all the changes you make take effect immediately).
    At the lower right corner, you can change the language, too.


    For Gaming: Yes; For Work: No

    The James Donkey 007 has plenty going for it. The quasi-metal flake finish is as perfect as you could ever expect (OEMs the world over, take note), and the overall build quality feels superb. Having so many options for customization is probably more “fun” than “useful,” but it does allow you a great deal of flexibility in determining your ideal setup.
    However, no matter how you configure this mouse, it’s not going to be for everyone. It’s only for right-handers, for starters, and the thing is rather heavy and somewhat large. Further, you have to keep track of all the extra pieces, which can be a slight annoyance. A possible dealbreaker for me is the scroll wheel; it’s simply too sensitive to be useful for day-to-day use.
    In a gaming environment, the scroll wheel issue didn’t bother me; I was able to toggle between weapons easily, and any incidental click was inconsequential. Further, I found the tracking to be clean and smooth in a first-person shooter, such that I felt that I had excellent control whether sniping targets or running and spraying enemies with gunfire. The heft of the 007 felt tedious to me in my day to day work, but in a game setting, I actually preferred it to a lighter mouse.


    It was also fun to set the left click button to vibrate for some haptic kick when shooting, and I found myself celebrating victories with the sound effects. (“Vroooom,” you are vanquished, sir!)
    With an MSRP of $69, the price isn’t bad for a mouse with these features and this quality. Street prices are a little better at $58.99, and you can find it here, too. Personally, I wouldn’t be inclined to use the James Donkey 007 for productivity, but I would certainly consider snapping one up for gaming.
    Noticia:
    http://www.tomshardware.com/news/jam...use,30780.html
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  9. #24
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
    Registo
    Nov 2013
    Local
    City 17
    Posts
    30,005
    Avaliação
    1 (100%)
    Cougar 450M Optical Gaming Mouse Review

    Introduction



    Today we’ll be taking a look at the latest gaming mouse from Cougar, the 450M. Equipped with a high-performance optical sensor, which is capable of up to 5000 DPI with a polling rate of 1000Hz, as well as an ambidextrous design, programmable buttons and more, it’s certainly going to appeal to a lot of gamers, and we’ve got high expectations for its performance too, after awarding multiple Cougar gaming peripherals here at eTeknix over the last year.
    Equipped with RGB lighting, eight fully programmable buttons, a powerful 32-bit ARM processors, side grips, as well as being backed up by the fantastic Cougar UIX software, the 450M is sounding pretty great for gaming. There’s also on-board memory, so you can store your profiles directly on the mouse, making it tournament friendly.

    The packaging is nicely designed, showing off the style of the mouse, as well as highlighting the UIX software and 16.8 million colours LED lighting.

    Around the back, quick run down of features like the Omron gaming switches, anti-slip flanks and programmable buttons.

    The 450M comes hard-wired with a really nice quality black braided cable, a custom shaped USB header and a gold-plated connector.

    Toda a review:
    http://www.eteknix.com/cougar-450m-o...-mouse-review/
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  10. #25
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
    Registo
    Nov 2013
    Local
    City 17
    Posts
    30,005
    Avaliação
    1 (100%)
    Razer Diamondback Gaming Mouse Review

    Introduction



    Razer has one of the most diverse range of gaming mice on the market today, with all kinds of unique shapes, sizes and specifications to suit a vast range of gamer’s and gaming styles. The Diamondback is one of their most iconic mice, having been around in one form or another since 2004, and having undergone several rather major redesigns in that time. Just look at the timeline below and you can see just how far it has developed in that time.

    Their latest model is supposed to be the best one yet, ditching the now archaic 1800 DPI 3G infrared sensor in favour of their latest extreme hardware, the 16,000 DPI 5G laser sensor, the very same one we recently tested in Razer’s insanely good Mamba 2015 mouse. Designed for use with both left or right hands, as well as a super slim ergonomic design that is ideal for palm, claw or fingertip grips, the Diamondback promises to be a bit of a jack of all trades when it comes to gaming, and should appeal to quite a lot of gamers, be that pro gamer or just those who want a nice mouse to use at home.
    “The Razer Diamondback made its debut in late 2004 at the World Cyber Games and took the gaming world by storm. This iconic gaming mouse was born from extensive research and engineering, hundreds of design iterations, followed by countless rigorous test sessions with eSports athletes. Featuring the world’s first optical gaming sensor, the original Razer Diamondback delivered the greatest accuracy and speed of its time.” – Razer
    Specifications

    • Ambidextrous form factor
    • 16,000 DPI 5G laser sensor
    • Up to 210 inches per second / 50 g acceleration
    • 1,000 Hz Ultrapolling
    • On-The-Fly Sensitivity adjustment
    • Chroma customizable lighting
    • Inter-device color synchronization
    • 7 programmable Hyperesponse buttons
    • Razer Synapse enabled
    • 2.1 m / 7 ft braided fiber cable
    • Approximate size: 125 mm / 4.92 in (Length) x 60 mm / 2.64 in (Width) x 30 mm / 1.18 in (Height)
    • Approximate weight: 89 g / 0.09 lbs (without cable)

    System Requirements

    • PC or Mac with a free USB port
    • Windows® 10/ Windows® 8/ Windows® 7 / Mac OS X (v10.8-10.10)
    • Internet connection
    • 100 MB of hard disk space
    • Razer Synapse registration (requiring a valid e-mail), software download, licence acceptance, and internet connection needed to activate full features of product and for software updates. After activation, full features are available in optional offline mode.

    A slim box with a few teasing details on the front, such as the full-spectrum Chroma lighting engine and 16,000 DPI laser sensor.

    Around the back, a few more specs, such as the 7-foot braided cable, programmable buttons, Razer synapse and the ambidextrous design.

    In the box, you’ll find the usual documentation, a few cool Razer stickers, as well as the hard-wired Diamondback mouse.

    The cable is nice and long (7-feet) and comes fitted with a gold-plated USB connector.

    Toda a review:
    http://www.eteknix.com/razer-diamond...-mouse-review/
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  11. #26
    GIF Master Avatar de tiran
    Registo
    Apr 2013
    Local
    Moscovo
    Posts
    4,882
    Avaliação
    16 (100%)


    Zowie... <3
    GOD OF AWESOME SIGNATURES - KING OF GIFS - TRIGGER OF TROLLS

    Ofendido por este post? Clique aqui.

  12. #27
    Tech Veterano Avatar de Viriat0
    Registo
    May 2014
    Local
    LPPT
    Posts
    4,702
    Avaliação
    7 (100%)
    Apesar de estar bastante satisfeito com o meu CM Mizar gostava imenso de experimentar o Mionix e o Rockat XTD. Olho para eles e vejo ali uma boa pegada... Pensei o mesmo do FUNC MS3 mas acabei por vender. eheheh lá está só experimentando.

  13. #28
    Tech Veterano Avatar de Morais-GT
    Registo
    Jun 2013
    Local
    Wherever I Want
    Posts
    2,783
    Avaliação
    11 (100%)
    Citação Post Original de Viriat0 Ver Post
    Apesar de estar bastante satisfeito com o meu CM Mizar gostava imenso de experimentar o Mionix e o Rockat XTD. Olho para eles e vejo ali uma boa pegada... Pensei o mesmo do FUNC MS3 mas acabei por vender. eheheh lá está só experimentando.

    Eu por outro lado acho que seria bastante difícil desabituar-me do Func. Agora sempre que peo no meu antigo Steelseries (que até gostava), penso que é das piores coisas que existe em termos ergonómicos.

    Acho que não cou conseguir mudar para um rato que não me apoie a pata como o func


    Já agora, para quem não sabe como é o rato:


    Última edição de Morais-GT : 04-01-16 às 17:56


  14. #29
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
    Registo
    Nov 2013
    Local
    City 17
    Posts
    30,005
    Avaliação
    1 (100%)
    Logitech is revamping the G502 Proteus mouse this year

    Back in 2014, Logitech launched the G502 Proteus Core gaming mouse, which swiftly became a favourite amongst PC gamers and received plenty of critical praise. Now, the mouse is getting a revamp, with Logitech set to release the G502 Proteus Spectrum later this year, the company has announced today at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES).
    The G502 Proteus Spectrum comes equipped with the Logitech G Delta Zero sensor, which has carried across multiple mice at this point and has proven to be very good each time, with DPI settings ranging from 200 to 12,000.

    On top of that, you will be able to customize your experience with five different weights in the mouse, this way, you can make the mouse lighter or heavier depending on your preference. The big craze in peripherals right now is RGB lighting, so Logitech is also including that here, giving users 16.8 million colours to choose from in order to fit the theme of their set up.
    The mouse will cost £69.99 from the Logitech store and is already available for pre-order though we would encourage you to wait for reviews to hit before making any purchase decisions.
    Noticia:
    http://www.kitguru.net/peripherals/m...use-this-year/
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  15. #30
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
    Registo
    Nov 2013
    Local
    City 17
    Posts
    30,005
    Avaliação
    1 (100%)
    SteelSeries Rival 700 aims to be more than just a mouse

    Generally speaking, I'm content with a mouse that simply does what I tell it to. If it tracks accurately and the switches in the buttons trigger reliably, that's all I really need. Of course, mice come in many shapes and sizes with all manner of button layouts. Form factor preferences aside, the basic goal remains the same: translate user input to the PC. SteelSeries believes that its Rival 700 mouse can do more than just the basics, though.
    The headlining feature of the Rival 700 is the OLED display positioned in front of the thumb buttons. Using SteelSeries' Engine software, users can customize the display to show anything from a running kill count, macro settings, DPI level, or even a clan logo or your online handle. The customization options extend to the Rival 700's hardware. This mouse features a modular Pixart PMW3360 sensor, swappable cables, seven programmable buttons, an adjustable DPI range from 100 to 16,000, a 1-ms polling rate, and 1:1 tracking with no added hardware acceleration.
    The Engine software also allows for configuration of the haptic feedback functionality of the mouse. Haptic feedback from a mouse isn't new, but it hasn't become mainstream during its existence, either. SteelSeries seems to think that notifications are the killer app for such feedback. Its software lets users program their mice to alert them when an ability is ready to use again in a game, for example, or when a player character is low on health. If you're in the zone and lose track of that information onscreen, a haptic reminder from the mouse could make all the difference.
    Noticia:
    http://techreport.com/news/29562/ste...n-just-a-mouse
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

 

 
Página 2 de 13 PrimeiroPrimeiro 123412 ... ÚltimoÚltimo

Informação da Thread

Users Browsing this Thread

Estão neste momento 1 users a ver esta thread. (0 membros e 1 visitantes)

Bookmarks

Regras

  • Você Não Poderá criar novos Tópicos
  • Você Não Poderá colocar Respostas
  • Você Não Poderá colocar Anexos
  • Você Não Pode Editar os seus Posts
  •