Registar
Resultados 1 a 7 de 7

Tópico: Google Pixel C

  1. #1
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
    Registo
    Nov 2013
    Local
    City 17
    Posts
    30,020
    Avaliação
    1 (100%)

    Google Pixel C

    Google Pixel C Is Now Available To Purchase – Here Are All The Pricing Details

    The last time we discussed something about Google Pixel C, it was the company’s first attempt to bring a powerhouse tablet that could also be capable to tackling work-related tasks. Here are all the pricing and specification details of Google Pixel C.

    Google Pixel C Will Have A Base Price Tag Of $499 Which Will Have 32GB Of Internal Storage – Read On More For Additional Hardware Details

    First and foremost, the chipset present inside the 10.2 inch tablet is none other than NVIDIA’s Tegra X1 SoC, which has been manufactured on the company’s Maxwell architecture. Given below are all the additional details of the chipset.

    • GPU cores: 256
    • DX12 capable: Yes
    • Processor configuration: 4 x Cortex-A57 (2MB L2 cache) + 4 x Cortex-A53 (512KB L2 cache)
    • Lithography: 20nm


    In short, the tablet will be packing a lot of firepower in that 10.2 inch frame. The resolution of Google Pixel C is 2560 by 1800 pixels and the display type is an LTPS LCD, which is the same one present in devices like OnePlus One. Supplementing the performance of the processor is 3GB of LPDDR4 memory so in terms of performance, you are definitely covered. In terms of data transfer, you are also covered quite extensively, because instead of a microUSB 3.0 port, you will find a Type-C USB port, which has a maximum data transfer rate of 10Gbps. Obviously, due to interface limitations, you will not be able to witness such speeds, at least till this technology does not progress forward.
    Our one gripe against Google Pixel C is that it does not feature an expandable storage option, and for a slate that is going to portray itself as the closest thing to a laptop substitute, we believe that such an option should have been available. There is however, a Bluetooth 4.1 module, along with an 802.11ac Wi-Fi adapter, plus an 8MP rear camera coupled with a 2MP front camera.
    Advertisements


    Video Player









    The tablet is going to be running Android Marshmallow 6.0 and sooner or later, we will definitely see the 10.2 inch slate being updated to the latest OS update, which is Android 6.0.1. Coming to the pricing details of Google Pixel C, they have been listed below.

    • 32GB model: $499 ($149 for the keyboard accessory, which is obviously sold separately)
    • 64GB model: $599 ($149 for the keyboard accessory, which is obviously sold separately)


    The tablet is available to purchase from the Google Store. Do you guys believe that Google Pixel C can provide you with makeshift notebook solution for work-related purposes? Let us know your thoughts.







    Source


    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  2. #2
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
    Registo
    Nov 2013
    Local
    City 17
    Posts
    30,020
    Avaliação
    1 (100%)
    Google Pixel C Review: Is Android M ready for productivity?

    The Pixel C isn’t the first tablet that’s been branded and sold by Google. Before the company has offered a collection of Nexus tablets, including the popular Nexus 7 and powerful Nexus 9, however this is the first one to be fully developed in-house. Not unlike the Chromebook Pixel laptop that runs Chrome OS, with the Pixel line Google means to show off what's possible to build using their software platforms even if it's inpractical for most to buy.
    The Pixel C packs a 10.2-inch high-res display alongside powerful internals and an interesting magnetic keyboard accessory. Running Android 6.0 Marshmallow, the device is positioned as Google’s flagship tablet and with a price of $499 for the 32 GB model, there’s no mistaking the Pixel C for a high-end device.

    That price is just for the tablet, too: if you want the keyboard accessory, be prepared to fork out an extra $149; and if you want 64 GB of storage, that’s an extra $100. The pricing structure is similar to other tablet-plus-keyboard products like the iPad Pro and Microsoft Surface Pro, although the Pixel C is a more affordable offering overall.
    So what does $499 of flagship Android tablet get you? To start with, the Pixel C is clad in a metal shell that wraps around all four sides of the device. Unlike many metal-bodied tablets, there is no gap in the design or any plastic inserts for wireless radio performance. Google has engineered this tablet in such a way that disrupting the beautiful back panel was unnecessary, leaving one of the nicest metal shells I’ve seen.

    The metal body looks and feels great, with a distinct premium feel that few other devices, like the iPad and perhaps the Surface line, manage to achieve. There’s no flex and the glass front panel with ideally-sized bezels complements the metal unibody from a visual and usability perspective.
    While the Pixel C’s metal body is visually appealing, it's a bit heavier than other similarly sized tablets. Compared to the Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 9.7, the Pixel C is 128 grams heavier: a difference that is noticeable in the hand. Where the Galaxy Tab S2 is comfortable to use in one hand for extended periods, I suffered from some light arm fatigue when using the Pixel C as an e-reader.

    The edges of the Pixel C include standard features and ports. When holding the tablet in landscape mode, the small power button is on the top edge’s left side, where it’s somewhat difficult to hit on a consistent basis. The volume rocker is at the top of the left edge, while at the bottom is a USB Type-C port. On the top of the right edge is a 3.5mm audio jack.
    The Google Pixel C features dual side-firing speakers, which I only occasionally muffled during two-handed landscape usage. With the speakers oriented in this way, it’s clear that Google expects you to primarily use the tablet in landscape mode and with the keyboard dock. This is in contrast to the Galaxy Tab S2 and iPad Air 2, which are both portrait-first tablets. The speakers are of decent quality, but like most small drivers, they’re not anything special.

    Along the top edge of the Pixel C are four small holes for microphones, presumably for some sort of voice recognition array. Curiously, the Pixel C doesn’t have always-on voice functionality that would make great use of these. Rumor is, the Pixel C was supposed to be Google's first Chrome OS tablet but with the hardware ready on hand for a while and the software not there yet, it was decided to ship with Android M instead.
    On the back of the Pixel C is a four-segment light strip, which serves two purposes. In general usage, the strip illuminates with the four Google colors, which acts as branding on the tablet as there's no other Google, Android, or Pixel logo to be seen. If the tablet is not in use, double tapping on the light bar will show you how much battery is left by illuminating however many bars are appropriate. This is a surprisingly handy feature, but I would have liked to see the light bar used for more cool functions.

    There are two cameras on the Pixel C: a front-facing 2-megapixel unit, and a rear 8-megapixel camera. As expected for a tablet, neither is excellent, but the front camera is capable of 1080p capture for the odd Hangouts video call.
    The Google Pixel C has a very nice display, coming in at 10.2-inches in size with a resolution of 2560 x 1800 and a pixel density of 308 ppi. The display is amazingly crisp and clear for reading text and viewing images, with great brightness (I record around 480 nits at maximum) and solid viewing angles. It's an IPS LCD, so it doesn’t have as deep blacks as OLED, but contrast is very good (over 1:4000 at max brightness).

    Color accuracy is good without being great. The LCD is calibrated to have accurate white balance and color temperature, but it’s slightly oversaturated and general accuracy falls behind a well-calibrated sRGB display. It’s not as terrible as a Samsung AMOLED, but you wouldn’t want to do any serious color-accurate work on this display.

    Toda a review:
    http://www.techspot.com/review/1117-...ixel-c-tablet/
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  3. #3
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
    Registo
    Nov 2013
    Local
    City 17
    Posts
    30,020
    Avaliação
    1 (100%)
    The Google Pixel C Review


    In early 2010, Google and HTC launched the Nexus One. While it was designed in a partnership between Google and HTC, it represented Google's first step into the arena of smartphone hardware design. Since that time, having a Nexus device designed and manufactured in partnership with another OEM has been something of a tradition for Google, and there have been many partnerships and products released in the six years since the Nexus One launched. While the Nexus program has remained strong, the products were technically branded by their respective manufacturers, even with Google's heavy involvement in the design process.
    In 2013 Google made an exception to the trend set by the Nexus devices. The device was not an Android device, but a Chrome OS device instead. It was the original Chromebook Pixel, and it was entirely designed, branded, and supported by Google. Last year the original Chromebook Pixel received a successor in the form of the Chromebook Pixel (2015). Google was clearly testing the waters of hardware design and cooperating with companies only for hardware assembly, but they were still yet to ship an Android device that was entirely Google made and branded.
    Last year's holiday launch of the Pixel C gave us the first Android device that is designed, branded, and supported by Google. It also cemented the Pixel branding as something that referred specifically to such devices, in addition to its original meaning of products which had sharp displays. The Pixel C is an Android tablet, and while it sits alongside the Google and HTC branded Nexus 9 it does not replace it. I've decided to put the Nexus 9 alongside the Pixel C in the chart below, as it's really the most relevant comparison that there is.
    Google Nexus 9 Google Pixel C
    SoC NVIDIA Tegra K1
    2.3GHz Dual Core Denver
    NVIDIA Tegra X1
    4 x 1.91GHz Cortex A57
    4 x Cortex A53 (Disabled)
    GPU 128 core Kepler GPU @ 852MHz 256 core Maxwell GPU @ ~850MHz
    RAM 2GB LPDDR3 3GB LPDDR4
    NAND 16/32GB 32/64GB
    Display 8.9" 2048x1536 IPS LCD 10.2" 2560x1800 IPS LCD
    Dimensions 228.25 x 153.68 x 7.95mm, 436g 242 x 179 x 7 mm, 517g
    Camera 8MP Rear-Facing (IMX219)
    1.6MP Front-Facing (OV9760)
    8MP Rear-Facing (IMX219)
    2MP Front-Facing (IMX208)
    Battery 25.46Wh 34.2Wh
    Launch OS Android 5.0 Lollipop Android 6.0 Marshmallow
    Other Connectivity 802.11a/b/g/n/ac + BT 4.1, Micro-USB 2.0 2x2 802.11a/b/g/n/ac + BT 4.1, USB Type-C
    Launch Price $399 (16GB) $499 (32GB), $599 (64GB)
    $149 Keyboard
    As you can see, the Pixel C is unique in a number of ways. That definitely befits the first ever tablet designed in-house at Google, but on paper the Pixel C really feels like a breath of fresh air after a long period of Android tablets that haven’t held up from a hardware perspective. Starting with the SoC, we see the first appearance of NVIDIA's Tegra X1 in a mobile device. It previously shipped in the SHIELD Android TV so this isn’t the first Android device with the chip, but it’s the first device to use it that runs off of a battery.
    We’ve covered Tegra X1 in the past, but a high level overview is that it’s an SoC with a 1.91GHz quad core Cortex A57 cluster and a rather beefy 256 core Maxwell GPU. Something important to note is that X1 does not use Heterogeneous Multi-processing, and would normally use cluster migration, which means you would either be running on the A53 cores or running on the A57 cores. In this case however the A53 cluster is actually disabled, so you're really working with a quad core A57 CPU. Paired with the SoC is either 32GB or 64GB of NAND, and 3GB of LPDDR4 memory.
    Moving on to the rest of the device, the next very interesting aspect is the display. It’s a 10.2” 2560x1800 panel with an aspect ratio that is essentially equal to the square root of 2. This choice of aspect ratio is interesting because it’s the same as the ratio used for A series paper which is used in pretty much every country outside of the US and Canada. In theory, this makes the display very well suited to displaying digitized documents. Since the display is wider than a 4:3 display, it does lend itself well to landscape rather than portrait use, and that ties in well with the keyboard accessory as well.
    As far as the other specs go, you get the same rear-facing 8MP sensor as the Nexus 9, with a slight resolution improvement to the front-facing camera. There's 2x2 802.11ac WiFi, along with Bluetooth 4.1 and a USB Type-C connector which has hardware, but does not offer complete software level support for USB 3.1 and alternate interface modes. Powering everything inside the tablet is a 34.2Wh battery.
    Design

    The Pixel line has always been notable for being entirely designed by Google, with industrial design that isn't influenced by the manufacturing and design capabilities of another company. This contrasts with Google’s strategy for their Nexus devices, which has been to partner with another manufacturer to jointly design and manufacture the device. As I mentioned before, the Pixel C is not a Chrome OS device like the existing two Pixel devices have been. Being a tablet, it seems that Google felt the Android platform would be better suited to the device than Chrome OS would be.

    Left: Pixel C. Right: Chromebook Pixel (2015)
    Despite Android being the software platform for the Pixel C, the hardware is unmistakably similar to the Chromebook Pixel. When looking at the outer chassis, one can see how the Pixel C could be mistaken for a smaller Chromebook Pixel. It’s built out of a single piece of aluminum, with a very squared off design. The Pixel C isn’t quite as flat on all sides as the Chromebook Pixel is, which is clearly a concession to allow for superior ergonomics when holding it. I don’t think the design is any less appealing than the Chromebook Pixel, which is to say it’s quite good. It is less striking than the very squared-off appearance of the Chromebook Pixel, but still unique among tablets.
    My only complaint is that the tablet is too heavy relative to its size at 517g. This becomes an even bigger issue when the keyboard dock is thrown into the equation. It’s ridiculously heavy at 399g grams, which brings the overall mass of the package to 916g. This isn’t as heavy as the Dell Venue 10 which I heavily criticized for its excessive mass, but it’s not far off. Google has an actual reason in this case, which is that both parts of the device are made out of aluminum, but in the end it’s just not as comfortable to use as the thinner and lighter iPad Air 2, and not even close to the Galaxy Tab S2.
    Something retained from the Chromebook Pixel is the light bar on the top. It lights up in Google’s signature red, blue, green, and yellow colors, and double tapping on the top of the chassis will cause the light bar to light up only a certain amount and color, which corresponds to the amount of remaining battery charge. This is still a very handy and unique feature, and it’s one of the small touches that makes a Pixel device stand out from the sameness of other tablets.
    On the sides of the Pixel C you’ll find a 3.5mm audio port, a USB Type-C port, and a pair of stereo speakers. Google has made sure to note that this is a full USB 3.1 implementation, and that support for alternate interface modes such as DisplayPort and HDMI output will be coming in the future. I personally don’t believe in trying to sell a device on the basis of future updates, and at the moment the port isn’t any more functional than what you’ll get on the Nexus phones or the OnePlus Two. I suspect that this is just due to lacking support within Android, and that topic of software synergy is something I’ll be touching on more later in the review. As for the speakers, they’re not very good. I wouldn't rate them as high as the Tab S2 or any of the iPads, even though those are all down firing. The Pixel C's speakers just seem quite shrill, and yet also muffled and somewhat echoey. The only way I can describe the acoustics is that they're as if you covered just adequate speakers with a pillow and placed them several feet away.
    Moving on to the front of the Pixel C, we see the intriguing 10.2” 2560x1800 display surrounded by a symmetrical bezel. The display lends itself more to landscape use even though it’s not as wide as 16:10 Android tablets, and this ties in with the keyboard dock which is used in the landscape orientation and magnetically connects to the front or back of the tablet. I’ll be talking about the Pixel C’s keyboard dock in a later section of the review, but as far as the design of it goes it’s made to fit perfectly with the Pixel C. The bottom is made of aluminum, and the primary keys are all of the same size and travel distance as the Chromebook Pixel. Google has had to shrink some of the keys on the edges in order to fit them into a keyboard that matches the 10.2” display area, but in my experience this hasn’t posed any serious issues apart from the enter key being difficult to press. As you can see above, the size also makes it well suited to more cramped circumstances, such as working when on airplanes or on the terribly small desks in some lecture halls.
    In the end, the Pixel C is as well designed and constructed as the Chromebook Pixel, and it rivals the best devices on the market in that regard. The aluminum chassis is sturdy, and there are no seams or visible screws. Google’s small touches like the light bar and tapping on the top to view your battery charge are also really nice additions, and they help it to stand out from other tablets, while also making it feel very Googley. That being said, having used the iPad Air 2 and the Galaxy Tab S2 makes it very clear to me how much heavier the Pixel C is, and it’s simply not as comfortable to use for long periods of time. The fact that you may often be using it with the keyboard dock can help mitigate this, but that only applies if you buy the keyboard and intend to use it frequently. Keeping the keyboard dock with you ends up increasing the mass significantly as well, and it gets to the point that you need to think about whether you’re willing to carry around something that is more like a small laptop than a tablet in terms of its size and mass. If you’re intent on buying the Pixel C and the keyboard to use it as a 2-in-1 then I think you’ll be fine with the Pixel C, but if you’re hoping for something that you’ll be comfortable carrying around as a standalone tablet you should definitely find some way to try it out to see if it’s manageable.
    Toda a review:
    http://www.anandtech.com/show/9972/t...pixel-c-review
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  4. #4
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
    Registo
    Nov 2013
    Local
    City 17
    Posts
    30,020
    Avaliação
    1 (100%)
    Google Engineer loses Chromebook Pixel after using bad USB-C cables

    Over the last few months, Google engineer Benson Leung has been testing out USB Type-C cables and rating them in an effort to stop consumers from buying dodgy cables that don’t meet the recommended specification for USB Type-C. Now, that mission has ended in one cable frying his Chromebook Pixel, essentially proving his point that bad USB cables can do serious damage to hardware.
    Leung’s reviews were posted on Amazon and the most recent cable to come across his desk was made by a company called ‘SurjTech’. Apparently this particular USB Type-C cable was “completely miswired” and ended up destroying his testing equipment, which included a Chromebook Pixel. Obviously, Leung didn’t realise it was miswired until after the fact.

    The engineer explained exactly where the company went wrong with its cable, saying” the GND pin on the Type-A plug is tied to the Vbus pins on the Type-C plug”. This is evidently a bad thing and can have an adverse effect on the hardware it comes into contact with.
    Due to this, Leung’s USB Type-C reviews will be “slowing down a bit” and he is not too happy about the incident. If you are planning on buying a USB Type-C cable, then you can check out Leung’s current reviews, HERE to find one that won’t break your device.
    Noticia:
    http://www.kitguru.net/laptops/noteb...-usb-c-cables/
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  5. #5
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
    Registo
    Nov 2013
    Local
    City 17
    Posts
    30,020
    Avaliação
    1 (100%)
    Revisiting The Google Pixel C - Better, But Not There Yet


    Last month I published my review of the Pixel C. While I thought it was a very interesting tablet, in the end I was unable to give it any sort of recommendation due to the severe software bugs that were present. To me, this was quite surprising, as Google has a fairly good track record when it comes to the software on the Nexus devices. During the review process I reached out to Google to voice my concerns about the issues. What both concerns me and gives me hope for the Pixel C is that Google was readily aware of most of the problems I brought up. It concerns me because I think the appropriate decision would have been to delay its release, but it gives me hope that these issues will be fixed.
    During my discussions with Google, I was offered the chance to test a new unit that would run a new unreleased build containing fixes that Google plans to release to the public in the future. Given the fact that the Pixel C has solid hardware that's only let down by buggy software, the chance to see Google's improvements before they are officially released presented a great opportunity to revisit the Pixel C and determine if Google's upcoming changes can change my original verdict about the device. For reference, we're looking at a slightly newer version of the Linux kernel, along with a change in the build number from MXB48J to MXB48T. This may change with the public release of the software.
    Before getting into my testing and experiences with this updated Pixel C, it's worth going over the major issues that I identified during my initial review. By far the most significant problem was the dysfunctional touch input. Taps wouldn't register, swipes wouldn't register or would register as taps, and in general the touch screen was just not usable. This is something that Google was aware of, and has claimed to address in this new firmware. The second big issue was the stability and performance of the software. I encounted so many app crashes and entire OS crashes that I ended up losing a page of the review that I was writing on the Pixel C, and I was forced to abandon any attempts to do so due to the high likelyhood of it occurring again.
    While the app and OS crashes seemed to happen at random, there were two very important applications that consistently had problems. The first was PCMark, and the second was our build of GFXBench with an infinite battery test. PCMark consistently crashed at some point during its battery test, leading me to abandon my attempts to get a final result after having the test crash several times. GFXBench presented an issue where the detection of charging would cause the test to stop. I suspected that this related to the inductive charging used for the keyboard, but I couldn't confirm it.
    The purpose of this article is to take a look at the new Pixel C unit provided by Google, and compare it to the one sent for the original review with the launch firmware. The main area of focus will be Google's work to fix the performance, touch input, and connectivity problems, along with some comparions that we rarely get to do due to the nature of single device sourcing. After looking at the areas where Google has made improvements, along with the areas where work is still needed, I've be able to reevaluate my original verdict on the Pixel C, and hopefully the changes will be enough to make it a tablet that is worth recommending.
    Toda a review:
    http://www.anandtech.com/show/9996/r...google-pixel-c
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  6. #6
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
    Registo
    Nov 2013
    Local
    City 17
    Posts
    30,020
    Avaliação
    1 (100%)
    Grab a Pixel C for $375 through Google's 25% off discount



    Google is offering 25% off their Pixel C tablets to coincide with the release of the Android N Developer Preview. With the discount code, prices for the standalone tablet drop to $375 for the 32 GB model (a saving of $125), or $450 for the 64 GB model (a saving of $150).
    The discount code does not apply to the keyboard base, so you'll still need to fork out an extra $150 to get the complete Pixel C package. However the hardware of the tablet itself still stacks up just a few months after its release, and at $375 it could be a compelling option for some.
    As a refresher, the Pixel C comes with a powerful Nvidia Tegra X1 SoC and 3 GB of RAM, which makes it a great system for gaming on the 10.2-inch 2560 x 1800 display. In our review we found the keyboard to be pretty lackluster, but the tablet itself is quite solid, especially now that Google has ironed out many of the software issues.
    Now that split-screen mutlitasking is coming to Android officially, and is available now through the Android N Developer Preview, the Pixel C becomes an more solid option for users who crave a productivity-friendly system. Android N isn't final just yet, but the Pixel C is a great test platform for the new feature.
    Unfortunately, Google's 25% off "limited time" discount on the Pixel C is only available to those in the United States who purchase the tablet through the Play Store. Even though this is a "developer discount", you don't actually have to prove you're a developer to qualify.
    Noticia:
    http://www.techspot.com/news/64053-g...le-25-off.html
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

  7. #7
    Tech Ubër-Dominus Avatar de Jorge-Vieira
    Registo
    Nov 2013
    Local
    City 17
    Posts
    30,020
    Avaliação
    1 (100%)
    Pixel C Developer Discounts Have Expanded

    A few weeks ago, Google published preview builds of Android N, and they announced a developer discount page for the Pixel C. At the time, it was US-only and applied to the 64GB version, bringing it down to $450 USD. The website also seemed... broken... so I wasn't sure if Google were fixing it or whatever. A few people received discount codes on the first run, but the websites now say that they will email you within a few days with a promotional code.

    The discount website has now been updated, and the terms have changed. The major difference is that it is now available in 13 countries: Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, France, Germany, Ireland, Netherlands, New Zealand, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and the United States, of course. The discount is now a blanket 25% off a Pixel C tablet (just one, like before). I haven't received the promotion code yet, so I can't confirm that it applies to both 32GB and 64GB models, but ZDNet claims it does, and Android Police states that Google confirmed it to them. The discount still does not apply to the keyboard.
    Google's Nexus line has been known to limit API access, specifically by not shipping OpenCL drivers and pushing developers toward their proprietary RenderScript instead. That said, it should be kept up to date with Google's latest OSes for longer than most devices. Also, Vulkan is being considered a Google-supported API, so, unless something weird happens, Pixel C should get those drivers, which should be sufficient for upcoming GPU compute and gaming tasks.
    Noticia:
    http://www.pcper.com/news/Mobile/Pix...-Have-Expanded
    http://www.portugal-tech.pt/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=566&dateline=1384876765

 

 

Informação da Thread

Users Browsing this Thread

Estão neste momento 1 users a ver esta thread. (0 membros e 1 visitantes)

Bookmarks

Regras

  • Você Não Poderá criar novos Tópicos
  • Você Não Poderá colocar Respostas
  • Você Não Poderá colocar Anexos
  • Você Não Pode Editar os seus Posts
  •